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 Collection: Congressional Research Service Reports
Results 1741 - 1750 of 1,901
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The Sequestration Process

The Sequestration Process

Date: February 25, 1999
Creator: Heniff, Bill, Jr
Description: None
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Timetable for Sequestration Actions

Timetable for Sequestration Actions

Date: February 25, 1999
Creator: Heniff, Bill, Jr
Description: None
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Government Performance and Results Act and the Appropriations Process

Government Performance and Results Act and the Appropriations Process

Date: February 17, 1999
Creator: Streeter, Sandy
Description: None
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Pay-As-You-Go Rules in the Federal Budget Process

Pay-As-You-Go Rules in the Federal Budget Process

Date: February 15, 1999
Creator: Heniff, Bill, Jr
Description: None
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Appropriations Bills: What are "General Provisions"?

Appropriations Bills: What are "General Provisions"?

Date: February 11, 1999
Creator: Streeter, Sandy
Description: An annual appropriations act generally consists of two parts – paragraphs providing funding, and general provisions focusing on non-funding as well as funding issues. Discussed on this brief fact sheet are what is found in general provisions of appropriations bills.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Earmarks and Limitations in Appropriations Bills

Earmarks and Limitations in Appropriations Bills

Date: February 11, 1999
Creator: Streeter, Sandy
Description: An annual appropriations act is generally made up of separate paragraphs, each of which provides funding for specific agencies and programs. Generally, each paragraph corresponds to a unique account and provides appropriations for multiple projects and purposes as a single lump sum. Earmarks and limitations are two devices regularly used in annual appropriations acts to restrict, or more precisely direct, the availability of funds for specific projects or purposes of an account. Sometimes an earmark or a limitation may generate more interest or controversy than the total appropriation.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Aviation: Direct Federal Spending, 1918-1998

Aviation: Direct Federal Spending, 1918-1998

Date: February 3, 1999
Creator: Fischer, John W & Kirk, Robert S
Description: The federal government has provided large financial resources in support of commercial aviation since 1918. This report details the amounts and types of federal spending that have occurred over this 80 year period. The report also discusses some of the issues that have shaped federal policy toward aviation and identifies some of the issues likely to affect federal spending in the future.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Proposed Budget Process Reforms in the Senate: A Brief Analysis of Senate Resolutions 4, 5, 6, and 8

Proposed Budget Process Reforms in the Senate: A Brief Analysis of Senate Resolutions 4, 5, 6, and 8

Date: February 1, 1999
Creator: Saturno, James V
Description: None
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Rural Water Supply and Sewer Systems: Background Information

Rural Water Supply and Sewer Systems: Background Information

Date: January 20, 1999
Creator: Copeland, Claudia
Description: None
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Environmental Reauthorizations and Regulatory Reform: From the 104th Congress to the 106th

Environmental Reauthorizations and Regulatory Reform: From the 104th Congress to the 106th

Date: January 8, 1999
Creator: Blodgett, John E
Description: The 104th Congress pursued efforts to reform environmental regulations on several fronts: (1) revising regulatory decision making processes; (2) attaching specific reforms to funding bills; (3) establishing a House corrections day calendar of bills addressing specific regulatory problems; and (4) incorporating regulatory reforms into individual program reauthorization bills. The 105th Congress has pursued regulatory reform in four primary directions: (1) proposals to establish a comprehensive cost-benefit/risk analysis framework for regulatory programs, (2) private property “takings” initiatives, (3) amendments and reforms directed at individual environmental statutes, and (4) oversight of environmental programs.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department