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 Collection: Congressional Research Service Reports
Dairy Policy Issues

Dairy Policy Issues

Date: September 27, 2002
Creator: Chite, Ralph M
Description: Several dairy issues that were debated during the 108th Congress are expected to continue as issues of interest in the 109th Congress. Separate bills were introduced in the 108th Congress to extend authority for both the Milk Income Loss Contract (MILC) Program and the dairy forward pricing pilot program, and to address dairy producer concerns about the importation of milk protein concentrates.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Dairy Policy Issues

Dairy Policy Issues

Date: August 20, 2002
Creator: Chite, Ralph M
Description: Several dairy issues that were debated during the 108th Congress are expected to continue as issues of interest in the 109th Congress. Separate bills were introduced in the 108th Congress to extend authority for both the Milk Income Loss Contract (MILC) Program and the dairy forward pricing pilot program, and to address dairy producer concerns about the importation of milk protein concentrates.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Dairy Policy Issues

Dairy Policy Issues

Date: June 28, 2002
Creator: Chite, Ralph M
Description: Several dairy issues that were debated during the 108th Congress are expected to continue as issues of interest in the 109th Congress. Separate bills were introduced in the 108th Congress to extend authority for both the Milk Income Loss Contract (MILC) Program and the dairy forward pricing pilot program, and to address dairy producer concerns about the importation of milk protein concentrates.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Resource Conservation Title: Comparison of Current Law with Farm Bills Passed by the House and Senate

Resource Conservation Title: Comparison of Current Law with Farm Bills Passed by the House and Senate

Date: February 28, 2002
Creator: Zinn, Jeffrey A
Description: None
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Emergency Funding for Agriculture: A Brief History of Congressional Action, FY1989-FY2001

Emergency Funding for Agriculture: A Brief History of Congressional Action, FY1989-FY2001

Date: December 11, 2000
Creator: Chite, Ralph M
Description: From FY1989 through FY2001 (to date), nineteen appropriations or farm disaster acts have provided $38 billion in emergency funding for U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) programs. Nearly $27 billion, or about 70 percent of the total amount, has been provided for FY1999-FY2001 alone. Since FY1989, the vast majority of the funds has been paid directly to farmers, primarily in the form of “market loss payments” (just under $17 billion, all since FY1999) to compensate for low farm commodity prices, and disaster payments($15.6 billion) paid to any producer who experienced a major crop loss caused by a natural disaster. The remaining $5.4 billion has funded a wide array of other USDA programs, including other forms of farm disaster assistance, farm loans, overseas food aid, food and nutrition programs, and rural development assistance.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Emergency Funding for Agriculture: A Brief History of Congressional Action, 1988-June 1999

Emergency Funding for Agriculture: A Brief History of Congressional Action, 1988-June 1999

Date: July 19, 1999
Creator: Chite, Ralph M
Description: Between 1988 and June 1999, thirteen emergency supplemental or farm disaster acts provided a total of $17 billion in emergency funding for U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) programs. The vast majority of this amount has gone directly to farmers, primarily in the form of disaster payments ($12.2 billion) to any farmer suffering a significant crop loss caused by a natural disaster, and "market loss" payments ($3.1 billion) to help grain, cotton, and dairy farmers recover from low farm commodity prices. The remaining $1.7 billion has gone to a wide array of other USDA programs, including those for other forms of farm disaster assistance, farm loans, and overseas food aid. Congress is expected to consider a multi-billion financial assistance package for farmers sometime this year.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
The U.S. Farm Economy

The U.S. Farm Economy

Date: February 13, 2006
Creator: Schnepf, Randy
Description: None
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Previewing a 2007 Farm Bill

Previewing a 2007 Farm Bill

Date: August 18, 2005
Creator: Womach, Jasper
Description: None
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Conservation Reserve Program: Status and Current Issues

Conservation Reserve Program: Status and Current Issues

Date: February 4, 2005
Creator: Johnson, Barbara
Description: The Conservation Reserve Program (CRP), enacted in 1985, provides payments to farmers to take highly erodible or environmentally sensitive cropland out of production for ten years or more to conserve soil and water resources. It is the federal government’s largest private land retirement program. The program is administered by the Farm Service Agency of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA), with technical assistance provided by USDA’s Natural Resources Conservation Service.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
A New Farm Bill: Comparing the 2002 Law with Previous Law and House and Senate Bills

A New Farm Bill: Comparing the 2002 Law with Previous Law and House and Senate Bills

Date: January 21, 2003
Creator: Jones, Jean Yavis
Description: On May 13, 2002, President Bush signed a new farm bill — The Farm Security and Rural Investment Act of 2002 (P.L.107-171). This comprehensive new law contains ten titles covering commodity support, conservation, nutrition, trade, research, credit, rural development and other related programs. It makes significant changes to commodity, conservation and nutrition programs, and is intended to guide most federal farm and food policies through FY2007. The Congressional Budget Office (CBO) estimates (using the March 2002 baseline) place the total cost of the new bill (i.e., baseline plus new funding) at just under $274 billion over its six-year life-span. This report discusses the bill in detail, as well as the arguments of both its supporters and critics.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department