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 Collection: Congressional Research Service Reports
Agroterrorism: Threats and Preparedness

Agroterrorism: Threats and Preparedness

Date: August 25, 2006
Creator: Monke, Jim
Description: None
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Agroterrorism: Threats and Preparedness

Agroterrorism: Threats and Preparedness

Date: August 13, 2004
Creator: Monke, Jim
Description: Although U.S. intelligence agencies have not identified any terrorist acts targeting agricultural production (i.e., agroterrorism) in the United States to date, the events of September 11, 2001 have awakened the nation to their possibility. Some experts estimate that a single agroterrorist attack using a highly contagious livestock disease could cost between $10 billion and $30 billion to the U.S. economy. This report addresses the use of biological weapons against agriculture, rather than the threat of terrorists using agricultural inputs for other purposes. It also focuses more on agricultural production than food processing and distribution.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Sustainable Agriculture

Sustainable Agriculture

Date: October 25, 1995
Creator: Rawson, Jean M
Description: None
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
U.S. Agricultural Trade: Trends, Composition, Direction, and Policy

U.S. Agricultural Trade: Trends, Composition, Direction, and Policy

Date: October 24, 2000
Creator: Hanrahan, Charles E & Dunkley, Mary L
Description: None
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
U.S. Agricultural Trade: Trends, Composition, Direction, and Policy

U.S. Agricultural Trade: Trends, Composition, Direction, and Policy

Date: August 11, 2006
Creator: Hanrahan, Charles E; Banks, Beverly & Canada, Carol
Description: None
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
U.S. Agricultural Trade: Trends, Composition, Direction, and Policy

U.S. Agricultural Trade: Trends, Composition, Direction, and Policy

Date: September 25, 2006
Creator: Hanrahan, Charles E; Banks, Beverly & Canada, Carol
Description: None
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Why U.S. Agricultural Exports Have Declined in the 1980s

Why U.S. Agricultural Exports Have Declined in the 1980s

Date: October 29, 1984
Creator: Hanrahan, Charles E
Description: None
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
U.S. Agricultural Trade: Trends, Composition, Direction, and Policy

U.S. Agricultural Trade: Trends, Composition, Direction, and Policy

Date: August 11, 2006
Creator: Hanrahan, Charles E; Banks, Beverly & Canada, Carol
Description: None
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
U.S. Agricultural Trade: Trends, Composition, Direction, and Policy

U.S. Agricultural Trade: Trends, Composition, Direction, and Policy

Date: September 25, 2006
Creator: Hanrahan, Charles; Banks, Beverly & Canada, Carol
Description: Leading markets for U.S. agricultural exports are Canada, Mexico, Japan, China, the European Union (EU), Taiwan, and Korea. The United States dominates world markets for corn, wheat, and cotton. Most U.S. agricultural imports are high-value products. The biggest import suppliers are Canada and the EU. Among the fastest-growing markets for U.S. agricultural exports are Canada and Mexico. Both the EU and the U.S. subsidize their agricultural sectors, but overall the EU out subsidizes the U.S. The U.S. has the most diverse food aid programs; others limit food aid to development assistance and emergencies.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
U.S. Agricultural Trade: Trends, Composition, Direction, and Policy

U.S. Agricultural Trade: Trends, Composition, Direction, and Policy

Date: August 11, 2006
Creator: Hanrahan, Charles; Banks, Beverly & Canada, Carol
Description: Leading markets for U.S. agricultural exports are Canada, Mexico, Japan, China, the European Union (EU), Taiwan, and Korea. The United States dominates world markets for corn, wheat, and cotton. Most U.S. agricultural imports are high-value products. The biggest import suppliers are Canada and the EU. Among the fastest-growing markets for U.S. agricultural exports are Canada and Mexico. Both the EU and the U.S. subsidize their agricultural sectors, but overall the EU out subsidizes the U.S. The U.S. has the most diverse food aid programs; others limit food aid to development assistance and emergencies.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department