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 Decade: 2000-2009
 Year: 2006
 Collection: Congressional Research Service Reports
Farmers' Markets: The USDA Role

Farmers' Markets: The USDA Role

Date: January 3, 2006
Creator: Becker, Geoffrey S
Description: None
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Price Determination in Agricultural Commodity Markets: A Primer

Price Determination in Agricultural Commodity Markets: A Primer

Date: January 6, 2006
Creator: Schnepf, Randy
Description: None
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Agriculture in the U.S.-Dominican Republic Central American Free Trade Agreement (DR-CAFTA)

Agriculture in the U.S.-Dominican Republic Central American Free Trade Agreement (DR-CAFTA)

Date: January 12, 2006
Creator: Jurenas, Remy
Description: On August 2, 2005, President Bush signed into law the bill to implement the Dominican Republic-Central American Free Trade Agreement, or DR-CAFTA (P.L. 109-53, H.R. 3045). In DR-CAFTA, the United States and six countries will completely phase out tariffs and quotas — the primary means of border protection — on all but four agricultural commodities traded between them in stages up to 20 years. The four exempted products are as follows: for the United States, sugar; for Costa Rica, fresh onions and fresh potatoes; and for the four other Central American countries, white corn. DR-CAFTA’s provisions, once fully implemented, are expected to result in trade gains, though small, for the U.S. agricultural sector. This report describes this agreement in detail, as well as the stances of both supporters and detractors.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
WTO Doha Round: The Agricultural Negotiations

WTO Doha Round: The Agricultural Negotiations

Date: January 12, 2006
Creator: Hanrahan, Charles E & Schnepf, Randy
Description: The pace of negotiations in the Doha Round of multilateral trade negotiations quickened in October 2005 as the December Hong Kong Ministerial Conference of the World Trade Organization (WTO) approached. At Hong Kong, however, while WTO members agreed on a broad outline of negotiating objectives for further liberalizing global trade in agriculture, industry and services, they made only limited progress in determining precise numerical formulas (known as modalities) for meeting the Round’s aims. WTO members agreed to intensify efforts to reach agreement on modalities and conclude Doha Round negotiations by the end of 2006. This report assesses the current status of agricultural negotiations in the Doha Round; traces the developments leading up to the Hong Kong Ministerial; examines the major agricultural negotiating proposals; discusses the potential effects of a successful Doha Round agreement on global trade, income, U.S. farm policy, and U.S. agriculture; and provides background on the WTO, the Doha Round, the key negotiating groups, and a schedule of historical and upcoming events relevant to the agricultural negotiations.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Agricultural Issues in the 109th Congress

Agricultural Issues in the 109th Congress

Date: January 13, 2006
Creator: Chite, Ralph M.
Description: A number of issues affecting U.S. agriculture are receiving attention in the 109th Congress. The conference agreement on the FY2006 omnibus budget reconciliation bill includes a net reduction in spending on U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) mandatory programs of $2.7 billion over five years, and the reauthorization of a dairy income support program. Other issues of importance to agriculture during the second session of the 109th Congress include the possible consideration of emergency farm disaster assistance; multilateral and bilateral trade negotiations; concerns about agroterrorism, food safety, and animal and plant diseases (e.g., “mad cow” disease and avian flu); high energy costs; environmental issues; agricultural marketing matters, and the reauthorization of the Commodity Futures Trading Commission. This report will be updated as significant developments ensue.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
U.S. Agricultural Policy Response to WTO Cotton Decision

U.S. Agricultural Policy Response to WTO Cotton Decision

Date: January 18, 2006
Creator: Schnepf, Randy
Description: None
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Exempting Food and Agriculture Products from U.S. Economic Sanctions: Status and Implementation

Exempting Food and Agriculture Products from U.S. Economic Sanctions: Status and Implementation

Date: January 20, 2006
Creator: Jurenas, Remy
Description: Falling agricultural exports and declining commodity prices led farm groups and agribusiness firms to urge the 106th Congress to pass legislation exempting foods and agricultural commodities from U.S. economic sanctions against certain countries. In completing action on the FY2001 agriculture appropriations bill, Congress codified the lifting of unilateral sanctions on commercial sales of food, agricultural commodities, medicine, and medical products to Iran, Libya, North Korea, and Sudan, and extended this policy to apply to Cuba (Title IX of H.R. 5426, as enacted by P.L. 106-387; Trade Sanctions Reform and Export Enhancement Act of 2000). Related provisions place financing and licensing conditions on sales to these countries. Those that apply to Cuba, though, are permanent and more restrictive than for the other countries. Other provisions give Congress the authority in the future to veto a President's proposal to impose a sanction on the sale of agricultural or medical products.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Fishery, Aquaculture, and Marine Mammal Legislation in the 109th Congress

Fishery, Aquaculture, and Marine Mammal Legislation in the 109th Congress

Date: January 20, 2006
Creator: Buck, Eugene H
Description: None
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
The World Trade Organization: The Hong Kong Ministerial

The World Trade Organization: The Hong Kong Ministerial

Date: January 20, 2006
Creator: Fergusson, Ian F; Cooper, William H; Jones, Vivian C; Langton, Danielle; Hanrahan, Charles E; Fletcher, Susan R et al.
Description: The World Trade Organization (WTO) held its 6th Ministerial summit in Hong Kong from December 13-18, 2005. WTO Ministerials are held every two years to bring together trade ministers from member states, often to make political decisions for the body. Although an original goal of the Ministerial was to agree on a package of modalities (methods by which the round is negotiated) for the ongoing Doha Development Agenda (DDA) round of trade negotiations, this aim was dropped in order to avoid a high-profile failure similar to previous Ministerials at Cancun and Seattle. Rather, members agreed to some modest advancements in agriculture, industrial tariffs, and duty and quota-free access for least developed countries. The final outcome of these negotiations could provide a substantial boost to the world economy, but if the round itself is not completed, there may be repercussions for the WTO as an institution and for the architecture of the world trading system.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
The World Trade Organization: The Hong Kong Ministerial

The World Trade Organization: The Hong Kong Ministerial

Date: January 20, 2006
Creator: Fergusson, Ian F; Cooper, William H; Jones, Vivian C; Langton, Danielle; Hanrahan, Charles E; Fletcher, Susan R et al.
Description: The World Trade Organization (WTO) held its 6th Ministerial summit in Hong Kong from December 13-18, 2005. WTO Ministerials are held every two years to bring together trade ministers from member states, often to make political decisions for the body. Although an original goal of the Ministerial was to agree on a package of modalities (methods by which the round is negotiated) for the ongoing Doha Development Agenda (DDA) round of trade negotiations, this aim was dropped in order to avoid a high-profile failure similar to previous Ministerials at Cancun and Seattle. Rather, members agreed to some modest advancements in agriculture, industrial tariffs, and duty and quota-free access for least developed countries. The final outcome of these negotiations could provide a substantial boost to the world economy, but if the round itself is not completed, there may be repercussions for the WTO as an institution and for the architecture of the world trading system.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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