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 Country: China
 Collection: Congressional Research Service Reports
Agricultural Trade Issues in the 106th Congress

Agricultural Trade Issues in the 106th Congress

Date: November 27, 2000
Creator: Becker, Geoffrey S.
Description: Agricultural interests have been following trade policy developments against a backdrop of weak foreign demand and large world supplies of agricultural products. The U.S. Department of Agriculture reports that the value of U.S. agricultural exports fell between FY1996 (a record year) and FY1999 by almost $11 billion. USDA forecasts agricultural exports at $50.5 billion in FY2000 and $51.5 billion in FY2001. However, the projected agricultural trade surpluses for those years, of $11.5 billion and $12 billion, would be less than half the FY1996 surplus of $27.2 billion. Many agricultural groups and their supporters in Congress believe that the sector's future prosperity depends upon such U.S. trade policies as: 1) encouraging China's entry into the World Trade Organization (WTO), with its binding rules and responsibilities; 2) exempting agriculture from U.S. unilateral economic sanctions; 3) fully using export and food aid programs; and 4) aggressively battling foreign-imposed barriers to the movement of U.S. farm products. A few U.S. farm groups are wary of such approaches.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Agricultural Trade in the 106th Congress: A Review of Issues

Agricultural Trade in the 106th Congress: A Review of Issues

Date: December 29, 2000
Creator: Becker, Geoffrey S.
Description: The 106th Congress considered a number of trade policy developments against a backdrop of weak foreign demand and large world supplies of agricultural commodities. The U.S. Department of Agriculture reports that the value of U.S. agricultural exports fell between FY1996 (a record year) and FY1999 by almost $11 billion, to $49.2 billion. Agricultural exports did climb back to $50.9 billion in FY2000, and are now projected at $53 billion in FY2001. However, the pace of recovery concerned many agricultural groups and their supporters in Congress. Although they recognize that many world economic, farm production, political, and weather factors influence exports, many of these groups believe that the agricultural sector's future prosperity also depends upon such U.S. trade policies as: 1) encouraging China's entry into the World Trade Organization (WTO), with its binding rules and responsibilities; 2) exempting agricultural exports from U.S. unilateral economic sanctions; 3) fully using export and food aid programs; and 4) aggressively battling foreign-imposed barriers to the movement of U.S. farm products. A few U.S. farm groups are wary of such approaches.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
China's Most-Favored-Nation Status: U.S. Wheat Exports

China's Most-Favored-Nation Status: U.S. Wheat Exports

Date: June 1, 1993
Creator: Ek, Carl & Epstein, Susan B
Description: None
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
China's Most-Favored-Nation Status: U.S. Wheat Exports

China's Most-Favored-Nation Status: U.S. Wheat Exports

Date: May 24, 1994
Creator: Ek, Carl & Epstein, Susan B
Description: None
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Agriculture and China's Accession to the World Trade Organization

Agriculture and China's Accession to the World Trade Organization

Date: March 13, 2001
Creator: Hanrahan, Charles E
Description: The prospect of future growth in demand for agricultural products makes China’s accession to the World Trade Organization (WTO) an important issue for the U.S. agricultural sector. Most agricultural interest groups strongly support China’s entry into the WTO, because they think it will increase U.S. agricultural exports and enhance farm income. In the 107th Congress, attention is focused on China’s final WTO accession negotiations where differences over agriculture have become an issue.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
China's Most-Favored-Nation Status: U.S. Wheat, Corn, and Soybean Exports

China's Most-Favored-Nation Status: U.S. Wheat, Corn, and Soybean Exports

Date: June 4, 1996
Creator: Sek, Lenore
Description: None
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Agriculture: U.S.-China Trade Issues

Agriculture: U.S.-China Trade Issues

Date: October 16, 2002
Creator: Becker, Geoffrey S
Description: With China’s entry into the World Trade Organization (WTO) in December 2001, U.S. agricultural interests were hopeful that longstanding barriers to trade with that vast and growing market would begin to fall. However, critics charge that China is failing to honor commitments to open its markets, affecting U.S. exports of grains, oilseeds, meat and poultry, and other products. U.S. agriculture and trade officials have been working to resolve these differences.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department