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 Decade: 2000-2009
 Year: 2005
 Collection: Congressional Research Service Reports
Gangs in Central America
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs6766/
Federal Grand Juries: The Law in a Nutshell
This report discusses the history and current role of the federal grand jury in the American criminal justice system. The federal grand jury exists to investigate crimes against the United States and to secure the constitutional right of grand jury indictment. Its responsibilities require broad powers. As an arm of the United States District Court which summons it, upon whose process it relies, and which will receive any indictments it returns, the grand jury's subject matter and geographical jurisdiction is that of the court to which it is attached. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs8310/
Science, State, Justice, Commerce and Related Agencies (House)/ Commerce, Justice, Science and Related Agencies (Senate): FY2006 Appropriations
This report monitors actions taken by the 109th Congress for the House’s Science, State, Justice, Commerce, and Related Agencies (SSJC) and the Senate’s Commerce, Justice, Science, and Related Agencies (CJS) FY2006 appropriations legislation. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc821123/
Gang Deterrence: A Legal Analysis of H.R. 1279 With References to S. 155
This report examines the Gang Deterrence and Community Protection Act of 2005, H.R. 1279, which as passed by the House, among other things, would dramatically increase the criminal penalties that follow as a consequence of a conviction for violent crimes, including gang offenses. It would expand the instances where juveniles charged with federal crimes of violence can be tried as adults and would authorize the establishment of criminal street gang enforcement teams. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc821518/
Remedies Available to Victims of Identity Theft
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Selected Federal Crime Control Assistance to State and Local Governments
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Gun Legislation in the 109th Congress
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Al Qaeda: Profile and Threat Assessment
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Terrorism in South Asia
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Immigration Consequences of Criminal Activity
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Material Support of Terrorists and Foreign Terrorist Organizations: Expiring Amendments in Brief
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Material Support of Terrorists and Foreign Terrorist Organizations: Expiring Amendments in Brief
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Long-Range Fifty Caliber Rifles: Should They Be More Strictly Regulated?
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Material Support of Terrorists and Foreign Terrorist Organizations: Sunset Amendments
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Terrorist Financing: U.S. Agency Efforts and Inter-Agency Coordination
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Cybercrime: An Overview of the Federal Computer Fraud and Abuse Statute and Related Federal Criminal Laws
The federal computer fraud and abuse statute, 18 U.S.C. 1030, protects federal computers, bank computers, and computers used in interstate and foreign commerce. It shields them from trespassing, threats, damage, espionage, and from being corruptly used as instruments of fraud. It is not a comprehensive provision, but instead it fills crack and gaps in the protection afforded by other federal criminal laws. This is a brief sketch of section 1030 and some of its federal statutory companions. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs9303/
Latin America: Terrorism Issues
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Federal Crime Control: Background, Legislation, and Issues
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Polygraph Use by the Department of Energy: Issues for Congress
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Military Aviation: Issues and Options for Combating Terrorism and Counterinsurgency
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs6193/
Gun Legislation in the 109th Congress
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs6170/
Latin America: Terrorism Issues
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Congress' Power to Legislate Control Over Hate Crimes: Selected Legal Theories
Congress has no power under the commerce clause over “noneconomic, violent criminal conduct” that does not cross state lines said Chief Justice William Rehnquist in United States v. Morrison. Congress, however, enjoys additional legislative powers under the spending clauses and the legislative clauses of the Thirteenth and Fifteenth Amendments. Extensive, if something less than all encompassing, national legislation may be possible under the confluence of authority conveyed by the commerce clause, spending clause, and the legislative clauses of the constitution’s Reconstruction Amendments, provided the limitations of the First, Sixth and Tenth Amendments are observed. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs7980/
Immigration: Terrorist Grounds for Exclusion of Aliens
This report opens with an overview of the grounds for inadmissibility and summarizes key legislation enacted in recent years. The section on current law explains the legal definitions of "terrorist activity," "terrorist organization," and other security-related grounds for inadmissibility and analyzes the legal implications of these provisions. The report then discusses the alien screening process to identify possible terrorists during the visa issuance process abroad and the inspections process at U.S. ports of entry. Where relevant, the report also discusses how recently enacted legislation affects these matters. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs10210/
State Statutes Governing Hate Crimes
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United States Sentencing Guidelines After Blakely: Booker and Fanfan - A Sketch
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Terrorism: Some Legal Restrictions on Military Assistance to Domestic Authorities Following a Terrorist Attack
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United States Sentencing Guidelines and the Supreme Court: Booker, Fanfan, Blakely Apprendi, and Mistretta
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs7277/
Digital Surveillance: The Communications Assistance for Law Enforcement Act
The Communications Assistance for Law Enforcement Act (CALEA, P.L. 103- 414, 47 USC 1001-1010), enacted October 25, 1994, is intended to preserve the ability of law enforcement officials to conduct electronic surveillance effectively and efficiently despite the deployment of new digital technologies and wireless services that have altered the character of electronic surveillance. CALEA requires telecommunications carriers to modify their equipment, facilities, and services, wherever reasonably achievable, to ensure that they are able to comply with authorized electronic surveillance actions. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs7259/
Terrorism and National Security: Issues and Trends
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Terrorist Capabilities for Cyberattack: Overview and Policy Issues
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Detainees at Guantànamo Bay
After the U.S. Supreme Court held that U.S. courts have jurisdiction to hear legal challenges on behalf of more than 500 persons detained at the U.S. Naval Station in Guantanamo Bay, Cuba in connection with the war against terrorism, the Pentagon established administrative hearings, called “Combatant Status Review Tribunals” (CSRTs), to allow the detainees to contest their status as enemy combatants. This report provides an overview of the CSRT procedures and summarizes court cases related to the detentions. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs7668/
Detainees at Guantànamo Bay
After the U.S. Supreme Court held that U.S. courts have jurisdiction to hear legal challenges on behalf of more than 500 persons detained at the U.S. Naval Station in Guantanamo Bay, Cuba in connection with the war against terrorism, the Pentagon established administrative hearings, called “Combatant Status Review Tribunals” (CSRTs), to allow the detainees to contest their status as enemy combatants. This report provides an overview of the CSRT procedures and summarizes court cases related to the detentions. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs7669/
The Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act: An Overview of the Statutory Framework and Recent Judicial Decisions
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs8022/
Terrorism Risk Insurance: An Overview
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs6785/
Drug Control: International Policy and Approaches
Over the past decade, worldwide production of illicit drugs has risen dramatically: opium and marijuana production has roughly doubled and coca production tripled. Street prices of cocaine and heroin have fallen significantly in the past 20 years, reflecting increased availability. Despite apparent national political resolve to deal with the drug problem, inherent contradictions regularly appear between U.S. anti-drug policy and other national policy goals and concerns. The mix of competing domestic and international pressures and priorities has produced an ongoing series of disputes within and between the legislative and executive branches concerning U.S. international drug policy. One contentious issue has been the Congressionally-mandated certification process, an instrument designed to induce specified drug-exporting countries to prioritize or pay more attention to the fight against narcotics businesses. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs6793/
Terrorism and National Security: Issues and Trends
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs6801/
Treatment of "Battlefield Detainees" in the War on Terrorism
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs6924/
Terrorism and National Security: Issues and Trends
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs6625/
Terrorism and National Security: Issues and Trends
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs6626/
Trafficking in Persons: The U.S. and International Response
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs6667/
Drug Control: International Policy and Approaches
Over the past decade, worldwide production of illicit drugs has risen dramatically: opium and marijuana production has roughly doubled and coca production tripled. Street prices of cocaine and heroin have fallen significantly in the past 20 years, reflecting increased availability. Despite apparent national political resolve to deal with the drug problem, inherent contradictions regularly appear between U.S. anti-drug policy and other national policy goals and concerns. The mix of competing domestic and international pressures and priorities has produced an ongoing series of disputes within and between the legislative and executive branches concerning U.S. international drug policy. One contentious issue has been the Congressionally-mandated certification process, an instrument designed to induce specified drug-exporting countries to prioritize or pay more attention to the fight against narcotics businesses. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs6421/
Drug Control: International Policy and Approaches
Over the past decade, worldwide production of illicit drugs has risen dramatically: opium and marijuana production has roughly doubled and coca production tripled. Street prices of cocaine and heroin have fallen significantly in the past 20 years, reflecting increased availability. Despite apparent national political resolve to deal with the drug problem, inherent contradictions regularly appear between U.S. anti-drug policy and other national policy goals and concerns. The mix of competing domestic and international pressures and priorities has produced an ongoing series of disputes within and between the legislative and executive branches concerning U.S. international drug policy. One contentious issue has been the Congressionally-mandated certification process, an instrument designed to induce specified drug-exporting countries to prioritize or pay more attention to the fight against narcotics businesses. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs6422/
Terrorism and National Security: Issues and Trends
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs6627/
NASA's Space Shuttle Program: Issues for Congress Related to The Columbia Tragedy and "Return to Flight"
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs6826/
Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act: Selected Legislation from the 108th Congress
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs6168/
Capital Punishment: An Overview of Federal Death Penalty Statutes
With the passage of P.L. 103-322, the Violent Crime Control and Law Enforcement Act of 1994, the federal death penalty became available as a possible punishment for a substantial number of new and existing civilian offenses. On April 24, 1996, the Antiterrorism and Effective Death Penalty Act of 1996 made further modifications and additions to the list of federal capital crimes. On June 25, 2002, P.L. 107-197, the Terrorist Bombings Convention Implementation Act of 2002, added another capital crime to the United States Code. The Intelligence Reform and Terrorism Prevention Act of 2004, P.L. 108-458, enacted December 17, 2004, included provisions which impacted or expanded some of the existing death penalty provisions. This report lists the current federal capital offenses and summarizes the procedures for federal civilian death penalty cases. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs6164/
Violence Against Women Act: History and Federal Funding
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Terrorism and National Security: Issues and Trends
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs8013/
Social Security Administration: Suspension of Benefits for Fugitive Felons
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs8321/
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