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 Decade: 2000-2009
 Year: 2002
 Collection: Congressional Research Service Reports
Terrorism: Near Eastern Groups and State Sponsors, 2002

Terrorism: Near Eastern Groups and State Sponsors, 2002

Date: February 13, 2002
Creator: Katzman, Kenneth
Description: None
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Industry Trade Effects Related to NAFTA

Industry Trade Effects Related to NAFTA

Date: May 15, 2002
Creator: Villarreal, M. Angeles
Description: None
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Why Certain Trade Agreements Are Approved as Congressional-Executive Agreements Rather Than as Treaties

Why Certain Trade Agreements Are Approved as Congressional-Executive Agreements Rather Than as Treaties

Date: April 5, 2002
Creator: Grimmett, Jeanne J
Description: None
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Why Certain Trade Agreements Are Approved as Congressional-Executive Agreements Rather Than as Treaties

Why Certain Trade Agreements Are Approved as Congressional-Executive Agreements Rather Than as Treaties

Date: May 10, 2002
Creator: Grimmett, Jeanne J
Description: None
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Why Certain Trade Agreements Are Approved as Congressional-Executive Agreements Rather Than as Treaties

Why Certain Trade Agreements Are Approved as Congressional-Executive Agreements Rather Than as Treaties

Date: August 14, 2002
Creator: Grimmett, Jeanne J
Description: None
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
The PLO and Its Factions

The PLO and Its Factions

Date: June 10, 2002
Creator: Katzman, Kenneth
Description: None
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Asia Pacific Economic Cooperation (APEC), Free Trade, and the 2002 Summit in Mexico

Asia Pacific Economic Cooperation (APEC), Free Trade, and the 2002 Summit in Mexico

Date: October 17, 2002
Creator: Nanto, Dick K
Description: On October 26-27, 2002, the Tenth APEC Leaders’ Meeting (summit) was hosted by Mexico in Las Cabos, Mexico. The official theme for APEC 2002 is to expand the benefits of cooperation for economic growth and development and enable the APEC vision to be implemented. For the United States, APEC raises fundamental questions that are of special interest to Congress. One is whether consensus can be achieved on the APEC vision of free trade and investment in the Asia Pacific or whether future trade liberalization will be confined primarily to bilateral free-trade agreements or multilateral trade negotiations under the World Trade Organization.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Asia Pacific Economic Cooperation (APEC), Free Trade, and the 2002 Summit in Mexico

Asia Pacific Economic Cooperation (APEC), Free Trade, and the 2002 Summit in Mexico

Date: December 11, 2002
Creator: Nanto, Dick K
Description: On October 26-27, 2002, the Tenth APEC Leaders’ Meeting (summit) was hosted by Mexico in Las Cabos, Mexico. The official theme for APEC 2002 is to expand the benefits of cooperation for economic growth and development and enable the APEC vision to be implemented. For the United States, APEC raises fundamental questions that are of special interest to Congress. One is whether consensus can be achieved on the APEC vision of free trade and investment in the Asia Pacific or whether future trade liberalization will be confined primarily to bilateral free-trade agreements or multilateral trade negotiations under the World Trade Organization.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Caribbean Basin Interim Trade Program: CBI/NAFTA Parity

Caribbean Basin Interim Trade Program: CBI/NAFTA Parity

Date: December 6, 2002
Creator: Pregelj, Vladimir N
Description: The entry into force, on January 1, 1994, of the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) has eliminated the advantage that the beneficiaries of the Caribbean Basin Economic Recovery Act (CBERA) and related provisions of the Caribbean Basin Initiative (CBI) had enjoyed in trade with the United States relative to Mexico, and gave Mexico an increasingly significant competitive edge over the CBERA countries. The scheduled further implementation of the NAFTA would have resulted in a substantial advantage to Mexico over the CBERA countries and vitiate in part the purpose of the CBERA.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Caribbean Basin Interim Trade Program: CBI/NAFTA Parity

Caribbean Basin Interim Trade Program: CBI/NAFTA Parity

Date: May 23, 2002
Creator: Pregelj, Vladimir N
Description: The entry into force, on January 1, 1994, of the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) has eliminated the advantage that the beneficiaries of the Caribbean Basin Economic Recovery Act (CBERA) and related provisions of the Caribbean Basin Initiative (CBI) had enjoyed in trade with the United States relative to Mexico, and gave Mexico an increasingly significant competitive edge over the CBERA countries. The scheduled further implementation of the NAFTA would have resulted in a substantial advantage to Mexico over the CBERA countries and vitiate in part the purpose of the CBERA.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Caribbean Basin Interim Trade Program: CBI/NAFTA Parity

Caribbean Basin Interim Trade Program: CBI/NAFTA Parity

Date: September 16, 2002
Creator: Pregelj, Vladimir N
Description: The entry into force, on January 1, 1994, of the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) has eliminated the advantage that the beneficiaries of the Caribbean Basin Economic Recovery Act (CBERA) and related provisions of the Caribbean Basin Initiative (CBI) had enjoyed in trade with the United States relative to Mexico, and gave Mexico an increasingly significant competitive edge over the CBERA countries. The scheduled further implementation of the NAFTA would have resulted in a substantial advantage to Mexico over the CBERA countries and vitiate in part the purpose of the CBERA.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Caribbean Basin Interim Trade Program: CBI/NAFTA Parity

Caribbean Basin Interim Trade Program: CBI/NAFTA Parity

Date: August 6, 2002
Creator: Pregelj, Vladimir N
Description: The entry into force, on January 1, 1994, of the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) has eliminated the advantage that the beneficiaries of the Caribbean Basin Economic Recovery Act (CBERA) and related provisions of the Caribbean Basin Initiative (CBI) had enjoyed in trade with the United States relative to Mexico, and gave Mexico an increasingly significant competitive edge over the CBERA countries. The scheduled further implementation of the NAFTA would have resulted in a substantial advantage to Mexico over the CBERA countries and vitiate in part the purpose of the CBERA.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Withdrawal from the ABM Treaty: Legal Considerations

Withdrawal from the ABM Treaty: Legal Considerations

Date: December 31, 2002
Creator: Ackerman, David M
Description: On December 13, 2001, President Bush gave formal notice to Russia, Belarus, Kazakhstan, and the Ukraine that the United States was withdrawing from the Anti-Ballistic Missile Treaty because of the constraints it imposes on the testing of missile defense systems; and six months later, on June 13, 2002, the treaty effectively terminated. The ABM Treaty has been in force since 1972. Pertinent legal questions that have been raised about U.S. withdrawal concern whether the treaty allows it; if so, the procedure to be followed; and, finally, the constitutionality of the President doing so unilaterally without the involvement of the Senate or Congress. This report briefly discusses these issues, as well as the recent federal district court decision in Kucinich v. Bush dismissing a suit by 32 members of the House challenging the constitutionality of the President’s action.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
New IMF Conditionality Guidelines

New IMF Conditionality Guidelines

Date: November 19, 2002
Creator: Weiss, Martin A
Description: None
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
International Criminal Court: Overview and Selected Legal Issues

International Criminal Court: Overview and Selected Legal Issues

Date: June 5, 2002
Creator: Elsea, Jennifer K
Description: None
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Chemical Weapons Convention: Issues for Congress

Chemical Weapons Convention: Issues for Congress

Date: August 5, 2002
Creator: Bowman, Steven R
Description: The CWC bans the development, production, stockpiling, and use of chemical weapons by members signatories. It also requires the destruction of all chemical weapons stockpiles and production facilities. Neither the United States nor Russia will be able to meet the original CWC’s deadlines for destruction of their CW stockpiles, and have been granted extensions to at least 2012. The Convention provides the most extensive and intrusive verification regime of any arms control treaty, extending its coverage to not only governmental but also civilian facilities. The Convention also requires export controls and reporting requirements on chemicals that can be used as warfare agents and their precursors. The CWC establishes the Organization for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons (OPCW) to oversee the Convention’s implementation.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Chemical Weapons Convention: Issues for Congress

Chemical Weapons Convention: Issues for Congress

Date: September 17, 2002
Creator: Bowman, Steven R
Description: The Convention provides the most extensive and intrusive verification regime of any arms control treaty, extending its coverage to not only governmental but also civilian facilities. The Convention also requires export controls and reporting requirements on chemicals that can be used as warfare agents and their precursors. The CWC establishes the Organization for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons (OPCW) to oversee the Convention's implementation. Chemical Weapons Convention implementing legislation, as S. 610, passed the Senate unanimously on May 23, 1997. This legislation, which was an amendment in the nature of a substitute reported from the Judiciary Committee, provides the statutory authority for domestic compliance with the Convention's provisions. It sets criminal and civil penalties for the development, production, acquisition, stockpiling, transfer, possession, or use of chemical weapons.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Chemical Weapons Convention: Issues for Congress

Chemical Weapons Convention: Issues for Congress

Date: October 29, 2002
Creator: Bowman, Steven R
Description: The Convention provides the most extensive and intrusive verification regime of any arms control treaty, extending its coverage to not only governmental but also civilian facilities. The Convention also requires export controls and reporting requirements on chemicals that can be used as warfare agents and their precursors. The CWC establishes the Organization for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons (OPCW) to oversee the Convention's implementation. Chemical Weapons Convention implementing legislation, as S. 610, passed the Senate unanimously on May 23, 1997. This legislation, which was an amendment in the nature of a substitute reported from the Judiciary Committee, provides the statutory authority for domestic compliance with the Convention's provisions. It sets criminal and civil penalties for the development, production, acquisition, stockpiling, transfer, possession, or use of chemical weapons.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Chemical Weapons Convention: Issues for Congress

Chemical Weapons Convention: Issues for Congress

Date: April 30, 2002
Creator: Bowman, Steven R
Description: The Convention provides the most extensive and intrusive verification regime of any arms control treaty, extending its coverage to not only governmental but also civilian facilities. The Convention also requires export controls and reporting requirements on chemicals that can be used as warfare agents and their precursors. The CWC establishes the Organization for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons (OPCW) to oversee the Convention's implementation. Chemical Weapons Convention implementing legislation, as S. 610, passed the Senate unanimously on May 23, 1997. This legislation, which was an amendment in the nature of a substitute reported from the Judiciary Committee, provides the statutory authority for domestic compliance with the Convention's provisions. It sets criminal and civil penalties for the development, production, acquisition, stockpiling, transfer, possession, or use of chemical weapons.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Chemical Weapons Convention: Issues for Congress

Chemical Weapons Convention: Issues for Congress

Date: June 24, 2002
Creator: Bowman, Steven R
Description: The Convention provides the most extensive and intrusive verification regime of any arms control treaty, extending its coverage to not only governmental but also civilian facilities. The Convention also requires export controls and reporting requirements on chemicals that can be used as warfare agents and their precursors. The CWC establishes the Organization for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons (OPCW) to oversee the Convention's implementation. Chemical Weapons Convention implementing legislation, as S. 610, passed the Senate unanimously on May 23, 1997. This legislation, which was an amendment in the nature of a substitute reported from the Judiciary Committee, provides the statutory authority for domestic compliance with the Convention's provisions. It sets criminal and civil penalties for the development, production, acquisition, stockpiling, transfer, possession, or use of chemical weapons.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Countries of the World and International Organizations: Sources of Information

Countries of the World and International Organizations: Sources of Information

Date: August 27, 2002
Creator: Salazar, Barbara A
Description: This report provides a selection of materials for locating information on foreign countries and international organizations. In the general information section, it presents sources giving an overview of politics, economics, and recent history. A specialized information section cites sources on human rights, immigration, international organizations, military strengths, terrorism, and other topics. Included are titles of some of the most frequently consulted bibliographic sources that are available for use in many libraries. Electronic information on foreign countries is also provided, via the Internet, by agencies of the federal government, international organizations, and related sources. Included is a list of foreign chanceries located in Washington, D.C.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
The Law of the Sea Convention and U.S. Policy

The Law of the Sea Convention and U.S. Policy

Date: October 21, 2002
Creator: Browne, Marjorie Ann
Description: None
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
The Law of the Sea Convention and U.S. Policy

The Law of the Sea Convention and U.S. Policy

Date: April 1, 2002
Creator: Browne, Marjorie Ann
Description: None
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
The Law of the Sea Convention and U.S. Policy

The Law of the Sea Convention and U.S. Policy

Date: May 28, 2002
Creator: Browne, Marjorie Ann
Description: None
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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