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 Decade: 1990-1999
 Year: 1991
 Collection: Congressional Research Service Reports
Allied Burdensharing in Transition: Status and Implications for the United States
This report describes recent changes in U.S. burdensharing relationships with NATO, Japan and South Korea and, in the process, identifies some implications for U.S. foreign policy. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs9/
China's Prospects After Tiananmen Square: Current Conditions, Future Scenarios, and a Survey of Expert Opinion
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs14/
Commercial Relations with the Soviet Union: Prospects for a Common United States Japanese Policy
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Desert Shield and Desert Storm Implications for Future U.S. Force Requirements
This preliminary assessment summarizes U.S. Army, Navy, Air Force, and Marine Corps performances during recent war, then relates it to past experience and potential threats in ways that might help decisionmakers determine the most suitable characteristics of U.S. armed forces for the rest of this decade. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs6962/
The Fair Labor Standards Act: Changes Made by the 101st Congress and Their Implications
Initially, in the 101st Congress, a measure to increase federal minimum wage (and to make numerous other changes in the FLSA) was passed by both the House and the Senate but, in June 1989, it was vetoed by President Bush. An effort by the House to override the President's veto was unsuccessful. Later, new legislation was introduced and approved both by the House and the Senate. On November 17, 1989, President Bush signed the bill (P.L. 101-107). digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc26025/
How to Follow Current Federal Legislation and Regulations
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Iraq-Kuwait: United Nations Security Council Resolutions Test and Votes -- 1991
This report lists the 12 adopted United Nations Security Council resolutions relating to the Iraq-Kuwait situation through October 1991. The texts of these resolutions, along with the votes by members of the Council, are included in this report. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc26023/
Japan: Resale Price Maintenance
Resale price maintenance occurs when manufacturers control the prices charged by wholesalers or retailers of their products. In Japan, such activities are prohibited, although certain exemptions are allowed. The U.S. concern over the practice is that it could allow Japanese firms to generate a secure profit base in their home market in order to finance aggressive price competition abroad. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs6/
Japan-U.S. Global Partnership: Implications of the Postponement of the President's November 1991 Trip to Japan
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs12/
Japan-U.S. Trade: A Chronology of Major Events, 1980-1990
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs19/
Japan-U.S. Trade and Economic Relations: Bibliography-In-Brief, 1990-1991
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs17/
Japan-U.S. Trade U.S. Exports of Negotiated Products, 1985-1990
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs20/
Japanese and U.S. Industrial Associations: Their Roles in High-Technology Policymaking
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Japanese Companies and Technology: Lessons to Learn?
American companies are facing increased competitive pressures from foreign firms. Many observers feel that U.S. firms lag behind their foreign competitors in the development, application, and marketing of new technologies and techniques. The Japanese industrial enterprise is characterized by a large proportion of private sector financing and many other factors, which this report analyzes at length. The question being debated by Congress is whether or not U.S. government programs and policies are an acceptable and effective means of supporting the efforts of American industries to operate in a manner consistent with success in world markets. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs7/
Japan's Prime Minister: Selection Process, 1991 Candidates, and Implications for the United States
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Japan's Response to the Persian Gulf Crisis: Implications for U.S. -Japan Relations
This report provides information and analysis for use by Members of Congress as they deliberate on the Japanese response to the Gulf crisis and, perhaps more important, what it may mean for future U.S.-Japanese relations. The first chapter briefly reviews Japanese government actions in response to the crisis, from August 1990 to February 1991. A second section examines in detail the various factors and constraints that affected Japanese policy. The final section offers conclusions and examines implications of the episode for future U.S.-Japanese relations. Published sources for the report are cited in footnotes. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs8/
Japan's World War II Reparations: A Fact Sheet
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Lobbying by Foreign Interests: Japan
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Military and Civilian Satellites in Support of Allied Forces in the Persian Gulf War
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs7996/
National Emergency Powers
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Persian Gulf War: Defense-Policy Implications for Congress
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Treatment Technologies at Superfund Sites
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Women in the Armed Forces
Women have become an integral part of the armed forces, but they are excluded from most combat jobs. Several issues remain. One is whether to reduce, maintain, or expand the number of women in the services as the total forces are being reduced. A second question is to what extent women should continue to be excluded from some combat positions by policy. Would national security be jeopardized or enhanced by increasing reliance on women in the armed forces? Should women have equal opportunities and responsibilities in national defense? Or do role and physical differences between the sexes, the protection of future generations, and other social norms require limiting the assignments of women in the armed forces? Opinion in the United States is deeply divided on the fundamental issues involved. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs8521/