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 Country: China
 Collection: Congressional Research Service Reports
China and the United States--A Comparison of Green Energy Programs and Policies

China and the United States--A Comparison of Green Energy Programs and Policies

Date: April 30, 2014
Creator: Campbell, Richard J.
Description: This report looks at the laws, programs, and policies encouraging development of wind, solar, and biomass power in the China and the United States. While hydropower is the most developed source of renewable electricity in both China and the United States, additional development of conventional hydropower is not currently a major focus of energy policy in the United States.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
China and the United States--A Comparison of Green Energy Programs and Policies

China and the United States--A Comparison of Green Energy Programs and Policies

Date: June 14, 2010
Creator: Campbell, Richard J.
Description: This report will look at the laws, programs, and policies encouraging development of wind, solar, and biomass power in China and the United States as the major renewable energy technologies common to both countries. While hydropower is the most developed source of renewable energy in both China and the United States, additional development of conventional hydropower is not a major focus of U.S. or China's renewable energy policy and will not be featured in this discussion.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
China and the United States—A Comparison of Green Energy Programs and Policies

China and the United States—A Comparison of Green Energy Programs and Policies

Date: March 30, 2011
Creator: Campbell, Richard J.
Description: This report looks at the laws, programs, and policies encouraging development of wind, solar, and biomass power in the China and the United States. While hydropower is the most developed source of renewable electricity in both China and the United States, additional development of conventional hydropower is not currently a major focus of energy policy in the United States.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
China and the World Trade Organization

China and the World Trade Organization

Date: August 6, 2003
Creator: Morrison, Wayne M
Description: China has sought over the past several years to become a member of the World Trade Organization (WTO), the international agency that administers multilateral trade rules. China’s WTO membership (as well as that of Taiwan’s) was formally approved at the WTO Ministerial Conference in Doha, Qatar in November 2001. On December 11, 2001, China officially became a WTO member. WTO membership will require China to significantly liberalize its trade and investment regimes, which could produce significant new commercial opportunities for U.S. businesses. A main concern for Congress is to ensure that China fully complies with its WTO commitments.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
China and the World Trade Organization

China and the World Trade Organization

Date: February 20, 2003
Creator: Morrison, Wayne M
Description: China has sought over the past several years to become a member of the World Trade Organization (WTO), the international agency that administers multilateral trade rules. China’s WTO membership (as well as that of Taiwan’s) was formally approved at the WTO Ministerial Conference in Doha, Qatar in November 2001. On December 11, 2001, China officially became a WTO member. WTO membership will require China to significantly liberalize its trade and investment regimes, which could produce significant new commercial opportunities for U.S. businesses. A main concern for Congress is to ensure that China fully complies with its WTO commitments.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
China and the World Trade Organization

China and the World Trade Organization

Date: November 19, 2001
Creator: Morrison, Wayne M
Description: China has sought over the past several years to become a member of the World Trade Organization (WTO), the international agency that administers multilateral trade rules. In September 2001, China completed its multilateral negotiations with the WTO Working Party handling its accession application and reached a trade agreement with Mexico, the last of the original 37 WTO members that requested a bilateral trade agreement with China. China’s WTO membership (as well as that of Taiwan’s) was formally approved at the WTO Ministerial Conference in Doha, Qatar in November 2001.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
China and the World Trade Organization

China and the World Trade Organization

Date: April 2, 2002
Creator: Morrison, Wayne M
Description: China has sought over the past several years to become a member of the World Trade Organization (WTO), the international agency that administers multilateral trade rules. China’s WTO membership (as well as that of Taiwan’s) was formally approved at the WTO Ministerial Conference in Doha, Qatar in November 2001. On December 11, 2001, China officially became a WTO member. WTO membership will require China to significantly liberalize its trade and investment regimes, which could produce significant new commercial opportunities for U.S. businesses. A main concern for Congress is to ensure that China fully complies with its WTO commitments.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
China and the World Trade Organization

China and the World Trade Organization

Date: January 17, 2002
Creator: Morrison, Wayne M
Description: China has sought over the past several years to become a member of the World Trade Organization (WTO), the international agency that administers multilateral trade rules. China’s WTO membership (as well as that of Taiwan’s) was formally approved at the WTO Ministerial Conference in Doha, Qatar in November 2001. On December 11, 2001, China officially became a WTO member. WTO membership will require China to significantly liberalize its trade and investment regimes, which could produce significant new commercial opportunities for U.S. businesses. A main concern for Congress is to ensure that China fully complies with its WTO commitments.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
China and U.S. Missile Defense Proposals: Reactions and Implications

China and U.S. Missile Defense Proposals: Reactions and Implications

Date: March 17, 1999
Creator: Sutter, Robert G
Description: The Chinese government has strongly criticized U.S. announcements that it will develop or assist in deploying missile defense systems involving cooperation with U.S. allies in East Asia, and reports of such possible U.S. cooperation with Taiwan. For those in the United States, the U.S. plans have many perceived disadvantages and advantages;1 the latter include notably providing degrees of protection for the United States and its allies against ballistic missile attack. Many in China believe that proposed U.S. development and deployment of ballistic missile defenses at home and in East Asia pose potentially serious complications for China’s ability to use its nuclear weapons to deter possible U.S. pressure and aggression, and to use Chinese ballistic missile capability to exert leverage over Japan, Taiwan, and others in East Asia.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
China/Asia Broadcasting: Proposals for New U.S. Surrogate Services

China/Asia Broadcasting: Proposals for New U.S. Surrogate Services

Date: October 1, 1992
Creator: Hennes, David A
Description: None
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department