You limited your search to:

 Country: China
 Decade: 1990-1999
 Collection: Congressional Research Service Reports
APEC and Free Trade in the Asia Pacific
This report discusses the summit held by President Bill Clinton and other leaders of the Asia Pacific Economic Cooperation (APEC) on November 19, 1995. The report discusses the primary reason for the summit, an Action Agenda intended to lead to free and open trade and investment among its members. The report also discusses how APEC countries were divided on certain issues going into this summit. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs261/
APEC - Asia Pacific Economic Cooperation: Free Trade and Other Issues
As a result of an initiative by Australia in 1989, the United States joined with eleven other Asia/Pacific nations in creating APEC, the Asia Pacific Economic Cooperation organization. This report discusses the annual Ministerial Meeting of APEC in Seattle, held from November 17 - 19, 1993. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs83/
China After Deng Xiaoping - Implications for the United States
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs240/
China and the Multilateral Development Banks
Congress is currently considering appropriations for U.S. contributions to the World Bank and other multilateral development banks (MDBs) as well as separate legislation that would require U.S. representatives to these institutions to oppose all concessional loans to China. This report provides a brief analysis of China’s relationship with the MDBs to highlight some issues and help Members of Congress, congressional staff, and observers better understand the context for the current debates in Congress and the multilateral agencies. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs466/
China and U.S. Missile Defense Proposals: Reactions and Implications
The Chinese government has strongly criticized U.S. announcements that it will develop or assist in deploying missile defense systems involving cooperation with U.S. allies in East Asia, and reports of such possible U.S. cooperation with Taiwan. For those in the United States, the U.S. plans have many perceived disadvantages and advantages;1 the latter include notably providing degrees of protection for the United States and its allies against ballistic missile attack. Many in China believe that proposed U.S. development and deployment of ballistic missile defenses at home and in East Asia pose potentially serious complications for China’s ability to use its nuclear weapons to deter possible U.S. pressure and aggression, and to use Chinese ballistic missile capability to exert leverage over Japan, Taiwan, and others in East Asia. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs949/
China/Asia Broadcasting: Proposals for New U.S. Surrogate Services
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs33/
China: Commission of Science, Technology, and Industry for National Defense (COSTIND) and Defense Industries
Congressional interest in the Chinese military, or People’s Liberation Army (PLA), has increased as a result of the March 1996 tensions in the Taiwan Strait, continuing allegations of Chinese proliferation of technology useful in weapons of mass destruction, and reports that some Chinese defense-related corporations have circumvented U.S. export controls to acquire dual-use technology. The Commission of Science, Technology, and Industry for National Defense (COSTIND), an important, high-level PLA organization, plays a role in China’s weapon programs, sales of civilian goods, acquisition of military technology, and arms sales and export controls. The purpose of this CRS Report is to examine the origins and command, roles, and influence of COSTIND. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs397/
China, Congress, and Sanctions - Findings of a Workshop-Seminar
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs333/
China: Current U.S. Sanctions
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs120/
China in Transition: Changing Conditions and Implications for U.S. Interests
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs147/
China in Transition: Changing Conditions and Implications for U.S. Interests
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs72/
China: Pending Legislation in the 105th Congress
This report tracks pending human rights legislation, including bills concerning: prison conditions and prison labor exports (H.R. 2195, H.R. 2358); coercive abortion practices (H.R. 2570); China’s policies toward religion (H.R. 967, H.R. 2431); and more general human rights issues (H.R. 2095). Other bills concern Taiwan — in particular, Taiwan’s entry into the World Trade Organization (H.Res. 190) and the U.S. role in helping Taiwan with a theater missile defense system (H.R. 2386). Also, legislation is pending on China’s missile proliferation activities (H.Res. 188), Radio Free Asia broadcasting to China (H.R. 2232), China’s participation in multilateral institutions (H.R. 1712, H.R. 2605), and the activities of China’s military and intelligence services (H.R. 2647, H.R. 2190). digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs760/
China Policy: Crisis Over Taiwan, 1995 -- A Post-Mortem
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs205/
China Policy: Managing U.S.-PRC-Taiwan Relations After President Lee's Visit to the U.S.
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs209/
China: Possible Missile Technology Transfers from U.S. Satellite Export Policy - Background and Chronology
Members of Congress are concerned about whether U.S. firms have provided technology or expertise to China for use in its ballistic missile program and whether a series of decisions by the Clinton Administration on satellite exports have facilitated legal or illegal transfers of missile-related technology to China. The New York Times reported in April 1998 that the Justice Department is conducting an ongoing criminal investigation into whether Loral Space and Communications (of New York), and Hughes Electronics (of Los Angeles) violated export control laws. The firms are alleged to have shared their findings with China on the cause of a Chinese rocket’s explosion while launching a U.S.-origin satellite in February 1996. In sharing their conclusions, the companies are said to have provided expertise that China could use to improve its ballistic missiles, including their guidance systems. This CRS report provides detailed background information, significant Congressional action, and a comprehensive chronology. The events summarized here, based on various open sources and interviews, pertain to various aspects of U.S. foreign and security policy. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs802/
China: U.S. Economic Sanctions
This report presents a history of U.S. economic sanctions imposed against the People's Republic of China for foreign policy reasons since 1949. It highlights sanctions that are currently active and details occasions on which those restrictions have been modified, waived or permanently lifted. The report provides citations for Presidential authority in current law and the Administration's issuance of regulations and administrative orders. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs450/
The China-U.S. Intellectual Property Rights Dispute: Background and Implications for China-U.S. Economic Relations
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs334/
China-U.S. Relations
This report discusses the background information and most recent development in U.S.-China relations since mid-1996. The relations also have been marred by continuing allegations of Chinese espionage, ongoing controversy over human rights, charges that China continues to violate its non-proliferation commitments, controversy over the accidental NATO bombing of the Chinese Embassy in Belgrade, and renewed tensions over Taiwan. The report describes current issues in U.S.-China relations such as; Human Rights Issues, Issues in U.S.-China Security Relations, Economic Issues, and Sovereignty Issues: Taiwan, Tibet, Hong Kong. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs217/
China-U.S. Relations
This report discusses the background information and most recent development in U.S.-China relations since mid-1996. The relations also have been marred by continuing allegations of Chinese espionage, ongoing controversy over human rights, charges that China continues to violate its non-proliferation commitments, controversy over the accidental NATO bombing of the Chinese Embassy in Belgrade, and renewed tensions over Taiwan. The report describes current issues in U.S.-China relations such as; Human Rights Issues, Issues in U.S.-China Security Relations, Economic Issues, and Sovereignty Issues: Taiwan, Tibet, Hong Kong. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs218/
China-U.S. Relations
This report discusses the background information and most recent development in U.S.-China relations since mid-1996. The relations also have been marred by continuing allegations of Chinese espionage, ongoing controversy over human rights, charges that China continues to violate its non-proliferation commitments, controversy over the accidental NATO bombing of the Chinese Embassy in Belgrade, and renewed tensions over Taiwan. The report describes current issues in U.S.-China relations such as; Human Rights Issues, Issues in U.S.-China Security Relations, Economic Issues, and Sovereignty Issues: Taiwan, Tibet, Hong Kong. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs699/
China-U.S.-Taiwan Economic Relations
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs336/
The China-U.S. Trade Agreement on Intellectual Property Rights: Implications for China-U.S. Trade Relations
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs206/
China-U.S. Trade Issues
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs122/
China-U.S. Trade Issues
U.S.-China economic ties have expanded substantially over the past several years. China is now the third largest U.S. trading partner, its second largest source of imports, and its fourth largest export market. However, U.S.-China commercial ties have been strained by a number of issues, including a surging U.S. trade deficit with China, China's refusal to float its currency, and failure to fully comply with its World Trade Organization (WTO) commitments, especially its failure to provide protection for U.S. intellectual property rights (IPR). This report explores these issues in detail, especially concerning the lack of protection for U.S. IPR. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs213/
China-U.S. Trade Issues
U.S.-China economic ties have expanded substantially over the past several years. China is now the third largest U.S. trading partner, its second largest source of imports, and its fourth largest export market. However, U.S.-China commercial ties have been strained by a number of issues, including a surging U.S. trade deficit with China, China's refusal to float its currency, and failure to fully comply with its World Trade Organization (WTO) commitments, especially its failure to provide protection for U.S. intellectual property rights (IPR). This report explores these issues in detail, especially concerning the lack of protection for U.S. IPR. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs214/
China's Changing Conditions
Congressional interest in the leadership change and economic transformation underway in China has grown substantially over the past few years. Leading congressional concerns focus on how economic conditions in China pose opportunities for U.S. enterprise and how the evolution of conditions in China fosters U.S. security, economic, and political interests. Congressional concern with China grew in 1995 and 1996 as a result of reports of the serious decline in the health of senior Chinese leader Deng Xiaoping. Present conditions in China include; A vibrant but sometimes overheated economy, A less divided central political leadership. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs6359/
China's Changing Conditions
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs245/
China's Changing Conditions
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs247/
China's Changing Conditions
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs246/
China's Changing Conditions: Possible Implications for US Interests
This report discusses possible outcomes and implications for U.S. interests vary. For example, increasingly effective political administration and reform with continued successful economic modernization would be generally compatible with U.S. interests in greater economic opportunity, foreign policy cooperation, and political liberalization in China. Alternatively, Chinese administration, economic vitality, and internal cohesion could degenerate, limiting U.S. economic opportunities, challenging U.S. interests in stability in East Asia, but also diminishing potential threats from a strong China. Finally, China could develop formidable economic power while retaining authoritarian political control, with China emerging as a world power less interested in accommodating U.S. interests than in opposing them. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs766/
China's MFN Status: Implications of the 1994 Decision
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs163/
China's Most-Favored-Nation Status: U.S. Wheat, Corn, and Soybean Exports
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs6361/
China's Most-Favored-Nation Status: U.S. Wheat Exports
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs160/
China's Most-Favored-Nation Status: U.S. Wheat Exports
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs79/
China's Prospects After Tiananmen Square: Current Conditions, Future Scenarios, and a Survey of Expert Opinion
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs14/
China's Rising Power: Alternative U.S. National Security Strategies - Findings of a Seminar
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs335/
China's Sinister View of U.S. Policy: Origins, Implications and Options
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs210/
Current U.S. Sanctions Against China
In the months following China's 1989 Tiananmen Square crackdown, both the President and the Congress took a number of initiatives protesting Beijing's actions. These initiatives centered around U.S. concerns related to trade, human rights, and non-proliferation. In intervening years, the United States has periodically imposed, lifted, or waived other sanctions and concluded several trade-related agreements with China relating to these concerns. Those measures that remain in place in 1994 are detailed in the accompanying tables. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs121/
Global Climate Change: Coal Use in China and Other Asian Developing Countries
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs848/
Granting Most-Favored-Nation Status to China as a Market Economy Country
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs161/
Hong Kong After Its Return to China: Implications for US Interests
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs765/
Hong Kong's Return to China: Implications for U.S. Interests
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs253/
Hong Kong's Return to China: Implications for U.S. Interests
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs351/
Legislative Procedure for Disapproving the Renewal of China's Most-Favored-Nation Status
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs362/
Taiwan-Mainland China Relations: Status, Prospects, U.S. Interests, and Options
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs211/
Taiwan: Texts of the Taiwan Relations Act and the U.S.-China Communiques
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs332/
Taiwan: Texts of the Taiwan Relations Act, the U.S. - China Communiques, and the "Six Assurances"
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs695/
Transfer of Missile and Satellite Technology to China: A Summary of H.Res. 463 Authorizing a House Select Committee
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs804/
U.S. Policy Toward the China-Taiwan Relationship: Summary of a CRS Workshop
No Description digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs204/
World Bank Lending to China
Lending to China from the multilateral development banks (MDBs) increased four-fold between 1985 and 1994, from $1.1 billion to $4.3 billion. China is now the MDBs' largest single borrower country. There is considerable debate today, however, whether the MDBs should continue lending to China. In particular, there is sharp debate whether the World Bank should continue making concessional loans to China. digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs330/