Legitimacy and Participation: A Longitudinal Analysis of Public Opinion in Costa Rica, 2004-2008

Description:

This study analyzes in a longitudinal context the dimensional conceptualization of legitimacy set forth by Booth and Seligson in 'The Legitimacy Puzzle in Latin America,' in which they found that legitimacy was composed of six different dimensions: regime institutions, regime principles, local government, political actors, political community, and regime performance.

Creator(s):
Creation Date: April 15, 2010
Partner(s):
UNT Honors College
Collection(s):
UNT Scholarly Works
Usage:
Total Uses: 32
Past 30 days: 14
Yesterday: 0
Creator (Author):
Pascoe, Henry

University of North Texas

Creator (Contributor):
Booth, John A.

University of North Texas; Faculty Mentor

Date(s):
  • Creation: April 15, 2010
Description:

This study analyzes in a longitudinal context the dimensional conceptualization of legitimacy set forth by Booth and Seligson in 'The Legitimacy Puzzle in Latin America,' in which they found that legitimacy was composed of six different dimensions: regime institutions, regime principles, local government, political actors, political community, and regime performance.

Degree:
Department: Political Science
Department: Honors College
Note:

Abstract: This study analyzes in a longitudinal context the dimensional conceptualization of legitimacy set forth by Booth and Seligson in 'The Legitimacy Puzzle in Latin America,' in which they found that legitimacy was composed of six different dimensions: regime institutions, regime principles, local government, political actors, political community, and regime performance. This study first tests whether the evaluation level of each dimension of legitimacy remains constant. The second part of this study tests whether the dimensional structure of legitimacy remains stable over time using 2004 and 2008 Costa Rica Survey data, identifying issues that researchers who conduct longitudinal studies under this dimensional framework should address in order to yield empirically valid results, and challenging assumptions made in recent longitudinal studies.

Physical Description:

20 p.

Language(s):
Subject(s):
Keyword(s): legitimacy | longitudinal studies | politics
Source: Seventh Annual University Scholars Day, 2010, Denton, Texas, United States
Contributor(s):
Series Title: University Scholars Day
Partner:
UNT Honors College
Collection:
UNT Scholarly Works
Identifier:
  • ARK: ark:/67531/metadc84352
Resource Type: Paper
Format: Text
Rights:
Access: Public