Characteristic Male Urine Microbiomes Associate with Asymptomatic Sexually Transmitted Infection

Description:

Article discussing research on characteristic male urine microbiomes associated with asymptomatic sexually transmitted infection.

Creator(s):
Creation Date: November 2010
Partner(s):
UNT College of Arts and Sciences
Collection(s):
UNT Scholarly Works
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Total Uses: 359
Past 30 days: 15
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Creator (Author):
Nelson, David E.

Indiana University

Creator (Author):
Van Der Pol, Barbara

Indiana University

Creator (Author):
Dong, Qunfeng

University of North Texas

Creator (Author):
Revanna, Kashi V.

University of North Texas

Creator (Author):
Fan, Baochang

Indiana University

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Easwaran, Shraddha

Indiana University

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Sodergren, Erica

Washington University

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Weinstock, George M., 1949-

Washington University

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Diao, Lixia

University of Texas

Creator (Author):
Fortenberry, J. Dennis

Indiana University

Publisher Info:
Publisher Name: Public Library of Science
Place of Publication: [San Francisco, California]
Date(s):
  • Creation: November 2010
Description:

Article discussing research on characteristic male urine microbiomes associated with asymptomatic sexually transmitted infection.

Degree:
Department: Biological Sciences
Note:

Abstract: Background: The microbiome of the male urogenital tract is poorly described but it has been suggested that bacterial colonization of the male urethra might impact risk of sexually transmitted infection (STI). Previous cultivation-dependent studies showed that a variety of non-pathogenic bacteria colonize the urethra but did not thoroughly characterize these microbiomes or establish links between the compositions of urethral microbiomes and STI. Methodology/Findings: Here, the authors used 165 rRNA PCR and sequencing to identify bacteria in urine specimens collected from men who lacked symptoms of urethral inflammation but who differed in status for STI. All of the urine samples contained multiple bacteria genera and many contained taxa that colonize the human vagina. Uncultivated bacteria associated with female genital tract pathology were abundant in specimens from men who had STI. Conclusions: Urine microbiomes from men with STI were dominated by fastidious, anaerobic and uncultivated bacteria. The same taxa were rare in STI negative individuals. The authors' findings suggest that the composition of male urine microbiomes is related to STI.

Physical Description:

7 p.

Language(s):
Subject(s):
Keyword(s): microbiomes | infections | bacteria | urine
Source: PLoS One, 2010, San Francisco: Public Library of Science
Partner:
UNT College of Arts and Sciences
Collection:
UNT Scholarly Works
Identifier:
  • DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0014116
  • ARK: ark:/67531/metadc78333
Resource Type: Article
Format: Text
Rights:
Access: Public
Citation:
Publication Title: PLoS One
Volume: 5
Issue: 11
Pages: 7
Peer Reviewed: Yes