Relative Efficiencies and Design Charts for Various Engine-Propeller Combinations, Special Report

Description:

The relative efficiencies of various engine-propeller combinations were the subject of a study that covered the important flight conditions, particularly the take-off. Design charts that graphically correlate the various propeller parameters were prepared to facilitate the solution of problems and also to c1arify the conception of the relationships of the various engine-propeller design factors. It is shown that, among the many methods for improving the take-off thrust, the use of high-pitch, large-diameter controllable propellers turning at low rotational speeds is probably the most generally promising. With such a combination the take-off thrust may be further increased, at the expense of a small loss in cruising efficiency, by compromise designs wherein the pitch setting is slightly reduced and the diameter is further increased. The degree of compromise necessary to accomplish the maximum possible take-off improvement depends on such design factors as overspeeding and overboosting at take-off as well as depending on the design altitude. Both overspeeding and designing for altitude operation have the same effect on the take-off thrust as compromising in that the propulsive efficiency is increased thereby; boosting the engine, however, has the reverse effect on the propulsive efficiency, although the brake horsepower is increased.

Creator(s): Biermann, David
Creation Date: September 1, 1936
Partner(s):
UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Collection(s):
National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics Collection
Technical Report Archive and Image Library
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Total Uses: 80
Past 30 days: 1
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Creator (Author):
Date(s):
  • Creation: September 1, 1936
Description:

The relative efficiencies of various engine-propeller combinations were the subject of a study that covered the important flight conditions, particularly the take-off. Design charts that graphically correlate the various propeller parameters were prepared to facilitate the solution of problems and also to c1arify the conception of the relationships of the various engine-propeller design factors. It is shown that, among the many methods for improving the take-off thrust, the use of high-pitch, large-diameter controllable propellers turning at low rotational speeds is probably the most generally promising. With such a combination the take-off thrust may be further increased, at the expense of a small loss in cruising efficiency, by compromise designs wherein the pitch setting is slightly reduced and the diameter is further increased. The degree of compromise necessary to accomplish the maximum possible take-off improvement depends on such design factors as overspeeding and overboosting at take-off as well as depending on the design altitude. Both overspeeding and designing for altitude operation have the same effect on the take-off thrust as compromising in that the propulsive efficiency is increased thereby; boosting the engine, however, has the reverse effect on the propulsive efficiency, although the brake horsepower is increased.

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Subject(s):
Keyword(s): aircraft design, testing and performance
Contributor(s):
Serial Title: NACA Special Report
Partner:
UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Collection:
National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics Collection
Collection:
Technical Report Archive and Image Library
Identifier:
Resource Type: Report
Format: Text
Rights:
Access: Public
Statement: No Copyright, Unclassified, Unlimited, Publicly available