Wind-Tunnel Investigation of the Stability of the Jettisonable Nose Section of the X-3 Airplane

Description:

Because previous work has indicated that jettisonable nose sections of airplanes may be inherently unstable, and thus may cause dangerous centripetal accelerations on a pilot after jettisoning during high-speed flight, an investigation has been conducted in the Langley 20-foot free-spinning tunnel to determine the behavior in descent of a model of the jettisonable nose section of the Douglas X-3 airplane. The effects of varying the center-of-gravity position, of attaching fins of various sizes, and of installing a stabilizing parachute were investigated. In the investigation the model descended with its front and trimmed 36 deg above the horizontal and rotated about a vertical wind axis while rolling about its longitudinal body axis. The nose section was made to descend in a stable front-down attitude when stabilizing fins were installed in conjunction with movement of the center of gravity forward or when a stable parachute was attached to the model.

Creator(s): Scher, Stanley H.
Creation Date: December 8, 1946
Partner(s):
UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Collection(s):
National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics Collection
Technical Report Archive and Image Library
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Total Uses: 59
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Creator (Author):
Date(s):
  • Creation: December 8, 1946
Description:

Because previous work has indicated that jettisonable nose sections of airplanes may be inherently unstable, and thus may cause dangerous centripetal accelerations on a pilot after jettisoning during high-speed flight, an investigation has been conducted in the Langley 20-foot free-spinning tunnel to determine the behavior in descent of a model of the jettisonable nose section of the Douglas X-3 airplane. The effects of varying the center-of-gravity position, of attaching fins of various sizes, and of installing a stabilizing parachute were investigated. In the investigation the model descended with its front and trimmed 36 deg above the horizontal and rotated about a vertical wind axis while rolling about its longitudinal body axis. The nose section was made to descend in a stable front-down attitude when stabilizing fins were installed in conjunction with movement of the center of gravity forward or when a stable parachute was attached to the model.

Language(s):
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Keyword(s): aerodynamics
Contributor(s):
Serial Title: NACA Research Memorandums
Partner:
UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Collection:
National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics Collection
Collection:
Technical Report Archive and Image Library
Identifier:
Resource Type: Report
Format: Text
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Access: Public
Statement: No Copyright, Unclassified, Unlimited, Publicly available