Proserpine; tragedie

Description:

With Proserpine, composer Jean-Baptiste Lully returned to his collaboration with librettist Philippe Quinault, which had been interrupted when the poet was banned from Court for offending Madame de Montespan (the king's mistress) with unflattering references in Isis. By 1679, Quinault had been restored to favor. Proserpine was first performed at St. Germain-en-Laye in February of 1680. Though seventeenth-century audiences were familiar with the story of Proserpine being carried off into Hades from numerous ballets and stage plays, Quinault returned to the source in Ovid's Metamorphoses to embellish the plot. In addition to details drawn from Ovid, Quinault added some of his own, making Proserpine among the most convoluted of Lully's operas. While the prologue alludes to King Louis XIV in the guise of Jupiter, the play itself refers specifically to the king's recent victories over the Spanish and Dutch when Jupiter battles and defeats the giants. Robert Isherwood notes that Jupiter's trip to Phrygia may represent Louis' inspection of Flanders after its defeat in 1679.

Creator(s):
Creation Date: 1680  
Partner(s):
UNT Music Library
Collection(s):
Jean-Baptiste Lully Collection
Virtual Music Rare Book Room
Usage:
Total Uses: 331
Past 30 days: 72
Yesterday: 2
Creator (Composer):
Creator (Composer):
Publisher Info:
Publisher Name: C. Ballard
Place of Publication: Paris
Date(s):
  • Creation: 1680
Description:

With Proserpine, composer Jean-Baptiste Lully returned to his collaboration with librettist Philippe Quinault, which had been interrupted when the poet was banned from Court for offending Madame de Montespan (the king's mistress) with unflattering references in Isis. By 1679, Quinault had been restored to favor. Proserpine was first performed at St. Germain-en-Laye in February of 1680. Though seventeenth-century audiences were familiar with the story of Proserpine being carried off into Hades from numerous ballets and stage plays, Quinault returned to the source in Ovid's Metamorphoses to embellish the plot. In addition to details drawn from Ovid, Quinault added some of his own, making Proserpine among the most convoluted of Lully's operas. While the prologue alludes to King Louis XIV in the guise of Jupiter, the play itself refers specifically to the king's recent victories over the Spanish and Dutch when Jupiter battles and defeats the giants. Robert Isherwood notes that Jupiter's trip to Phrygia may represent Louis' inspection of Flanders after its defeat in 1679.

Physical Description:

score ([4], 72, 355 p.) 36 cm.

Language(s):
Subject(s):
Uniform Title: Proserpine
Added Title: Metamorphoses
Partner:
UNT Music Library
Collection:
Jean-Baptiste Lully Collection
Collection:
Virtual Music Rare Book Room
Identifier:
Resource Type: Musical Score/Notation
Format: Image
Rights:
Access: Public