Federal Register, Volume 76, Number 149, August 3, 2011, Pages 46595-47054

46642 Federal Register/Vol. 76, No. 149/Wednesday, August 3, 2011 /Rules and Regulations

noted the vegetation at this site differed
from the other colonies probably as a
result of human disturbance. TDEC
(1996, Appendix I, p. XXI) noted the
poor condition of Echinacea
tennesseensis plants during a site visit
to colony 4.1 in 1996, and observed no
plants at this colony in 2005 (TDEC
2006, p. 4). The mean ratio of juveniles
to adults for this colony over 4 years of
monitoring was 4.52 (Table 2) and
density estimates (Table 3) were
comparable to or exceeded the initial
estimate provided by Drew and Clebsch
for 1987 (1995, p. 62), until the colony
was destroyed sometime after
monitoring was conducted during 2004
and before flowering stems were
counted at each colony in 2005.
Colonies 4.2 and 4.3 were established
from seeds and cultivated juveniles
planted on COE lands at J. Percy Priest
Reservoir in the years 1989 through
1991 (TDEC 1991, pp. 5-6), and earthen
berms have been constructed at both
sites to deter ORV traffic and reduce
visibility of these colonies. In 1996,
colony 4.2 contained many robust adult
plants, but few seedlings and non-
flowering adults, in an area of 32 m2
(344 ft2) (TDEC 1996, Appendix I, p.
XXII). In 2005, TDEC reported there
were 6,183 flowering stems at colony
4.2. TDEC first conducted quantitative
monitoring at this colony in 2006, when
the ratio of juveniles to adults they
sampled was 4.78 (Table 2). The
estimated mean density was 11.60 E.
tennesseensis per square meter (Table
3). This secure colony is located in the
Elsie Quarterman Cedar Glade DSNA,
on COE lands at J. Percy Priest
Reservoir, and appears to be self-
sustaining based on the quantitative and
qualitative data available. Colony 4.3 is
located near the COE Hurricane Public
Access Area. In 1996, this colony
consisted of many robust adult plants
and abundant juveniles in an area of
about 68 m2 (732 ft2) (TDEC 1996,
Appendix I, p. XXIII). In 2005, TDEC
(2006, p. 5) counted 385 flowering stems
at this colony. TDEC (unpublished data)
first conducted quantitative monitoring
at this colony in 2006, when the ratio of
juveniles to adults they sampled was
11.95 (Table 2). The estimated mean
density was 19.50 E. tennesseensis per
square meter (Table 3). However, we
acknowledge that the confidence
intervals for the density estimates at
both sites are large, reflecting a high
degree of variability among the transects
that were sampled at each colony. We
believe that colony 4.3 is self-sustaining;
however, it is vulnerable to impacts
from illegal ORV access as noted above.

Based on available data, colony 4.2 is

the only secure and self-sustaining
colony in the Allvan population.
The Couchville population (number 5
in the recovery plan) consisted of a
single known colony spanning
approximately eight privately owned
tracts when the recovery plan was
completed (Service 1989, p. 7). This
population now consists of three natural
and five introduced colonies, all located
within an approximately 2.8-km2 (1.1-
mi2) area of Davidson and Rutherford
Counties on lands owned by the State of
Tennessee (except for colony 5.2, which
is on private land). Drew and Clebsch
(1995, p. 62) estimated a total of 89,300
plants at colony 5.1 in 1987, occupying
an estimated area of 13,860 m2 (149,189
ft2). TDEC (2006, p. 4) reported there
were 7,353 flowering stems at this site
in 2005. The mean ratio of juveniles to
adults for this colony over 6 years of
monitoring is 3.87 (Table 2) and density
estimates (Table 3) have remained
comparable to the initial estimate
provided by Drew and Clebsch for 1987
(1995, p. 62). Colony 5.2 is divided
between two privately owned
properties. The plants in this colony are
found in habitats of varying quality,
having been subjected to past
disturbance in some places, and in
1993, vegetative plants were observed
occupying an area of approximately
1,823 m2 (19,623 ft2) (TDEC 1996,
Appendix I, p. XXV). TDEC (2006, p. 4)
reported there were 392 flowering stems
at this colony in 2005. Colonies 5.3
through 5.6 were established from seed
and juveniles planted at Long Hunter
State Park during 1989 through 1991.
TDEC (1996, Appendix I, p. XXVI)
observed 428 plants at colony 5.3 in
1996, and noted that they were spread
out over a wide area; in 2005, TDEC
(2006, p. 4) reported there were 1,607
flowering stems at this colony. TDEC
(1996, Appendix I, p. XXVII) observed
that a thriving population containing
thousands of individuals had become
established at colony 5.4 by 1996, and
that the plants north of the road
dividing this colony occupied an area of
2,153 m2 (23,175 ft2); in 2005, TDEC
(2006, p. 5) counted 863 and 987
flowering stems on the north and south
sides of the road, respectively. Colony
5.5 consisted of less than 200 total
plants occupying an estimated area of
53 m2 (570 ft2) in 1996 (TDEC 1996,
Appendix I, pp. XXVIII-XXIX); in 2005,
there were 1,300 flowering stems (TDEC
2006, p. 4). TDEC (unpublished data)
first conducted quantitative monitoring
at this colony in 2006, when the ratio of
juveniles to adults they sampled was
4.12 (Table 2) and the estimated density

was 12.03 Echinacea tennesseensis per

square meter (Table 3). Colony 5.6
consisted of approximately 2,000 plants
occupying an area of 51 m2 (549 ft2) in
1996 (TDEC 1996, Appendix I, p. XXIX-
XXX); in 2005, there were 846 flowering
stems (TDEC 2006, p. 5). Colony 5.7, for
which no historic monitoring data are
available, is the only naturally occurring
colony at Long Hunter State Park. TDEC
(2006, p. 4) counted 17 flowering stems
here in 2005. Colony 5.8 was
established in 2000 at the Fate Sanders
Barrens DSNA, located on COE lands at
J. Percy Priest Reservoir. This colony is
located approximately 3.5 km (2.8 mi)
southeast of colony 5.3 in the
Couchville population. TDEC planted
199 plants into two areas at this colony
in 2000 (Lincicome 2008, pers. comm.)
and counted 101 flowering stems in
2005 (TDEC 2006, p. 5). Based on
available qualitative and quantitative
data, we believe that the secure colonies
(5.1, 5.4, 5.6, and 5.8) in the Couchville
population are self-sustaining,. We
believe that three of the four colonies
we consider not secure are also self-
sustaining. The total number of
flowering stems from the Couchville
population in secure and self-sustaining
colonies was 10,150 in 2005. Colonies
that we do not consider secure
accounted for an estimated 3,316
flowering stems in 2005.
The Stones River National Battlefield
population (i.e., population 6, not
included in the recovery plan) consists
of three colonies established through
introductions into an area that is now a
DSNA. Colony 6.1 was established from
seeds introduced by Hemmerly in 1970
(1976, pp. 10, 81) as part of
investigations into seedling survival
under field conditions. This colony
consists of two groupings of plants, one
of which consisted of 3,880 plants and
the other of 28 plants in 1995; the
colony occupied an area of 39 m2 (420
ft2) in 1996 (TDEC 1996, Appendix I, p.
XXXI). TDEC (2006, p. 4) counted 2,535
flowering stems at this colony in 2005.
TDEC first conducted quantitative
monitoring at colony 6.1 in 2006, when
the ratio of juveniles to adults they
sampled was 5.18 (Table 2). The
estimated mean density was 41.37
Echinacea tennesseensis per square
meter (Table 3), but the confidence
interval at this site was large, reflecting
a high degree of variability among the
sampled transects, some of which
contained no plants. Colonies 6.2 and
6.3 are thought to have been established
by a neighbor of the battlefield in the
mid-1990s (Hogan 2008, pers. comm.)
and consisted of 134 and 401 plants,
respectively, in 1995 (TDEC 1996,

Appendix I, p. XXXII). In 2005, TDEC

United States. Office of the Federal Register. Federal Register, Volume 76, Number 149, August 3, 2011, Pages 46595-47054. Washington D.C.. UNT Digital Library. http://digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc52326/. Accessed November 22, 2014.