An Examination of Methodological Rigor and Its Effects on Organizational Development and Change Outcomes

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Description:

Organizational development and change (ODC) is a broad field because change occurs in all organizations, occurs at multiple organizational levels, consists of numerous interventions, and can impact multiple outcomes. Many ODC efforts attempt to examine the effectiveness of their initiatives, yet fail to account for the quality, or rigor of their methods. The purpose of this paper is to examine how methodological rigor and intervention implementation quality impact ODC outcomes. The results indicate that overall methodological rigor is not a significant predictor of organizational change outcomes; however, several individual rigor criteria exhibit predictive power. Implementation quality is a significant predictor of organizational outcomes, but in a negative direction.

Creator(s): Alexander, Sandra G.
Creation Date: May 2005
Partner(s):
UNT Libraries
Collection(s):
UNT Theses and Dissertations
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Total Uses: 280
Past 30 days: 3
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Publisher Info:
Publisher Name: University of North Texas
Place of Publication: Denton, Texas
Date(s):
  • Creation: May 2005
  • Digitized: February 8, 2008
Description:

Organizational development and change (ODC) is a broad field because change occurs in all organizations, occurs at multiple organizational levels, consists of numerous interventions, and can impact multiple outcomes. Many ODC efforts attempt to examine the effectiveness of their initiatives, yet fail to account for the quality, or rigor of their methods. The purpose of this paper is to examine how methodological rigor and intervention implementation quality impact ODC outcomes. The results indicate that overall methodological rigor is not a significant predictor of organizational change outcomes; however, several individual rigor criteria exhibit predictive power. Implementation quality is a significant predictor of organizational outcomes, but in a negative direction.

Degree:
Level: Master's
Discipline: Psychology
Language(s):
Subject(s):
Keyword(s): methodological rigor | organizational change | meta-analysis
Contributor(s):
Partner:
UNT Libraries
Collection:
UNT Theses and Dissertations
Identifier:
  • OCLC: 62093638 |
  • ARK: ark:/67531/metadc4741
Resource Type: Thesis or Dissertation
Format: Text
Rights:
Access: Use restricted to UNT Community
License: Copyright
Holder: Alexander, Sandra G.
Statement: Copyright is held by the author, unless otherwise noted. All rights reserved.