A Historical Survey of the Euphonium and Its Future in Non-Traditional Ensembles Together with Three Recitals of Selected Works by Jan Bach, Neal Corwell, Vladimir Cosma, and Others

Description:

The euphonium has been a respected member of military bands, brass bands, and civilian concert (wind) bands since its invention in 1843. These bands were very visible to the public, and often performed popular music of the day. Since then, the euphonium has had occasional use in orchestral works, jazz, and in brass chamber groups as well. However, by the middle of the 20th century, its traditional use as an instrument of the wind band resulted in a prevailing attitude of the music world toward the euphonium as an instrument strictly for that purpose. This attitude, along with changing popular tastes in music, has over time caused professional opportunities for euphoniumists to become very limited. This lack of public expose for the instrument has therefore resulted in people outside of wind band experience being unaware of the euphonium's existence. There have been, however, positive signs in the last thirty years that changes are taking place in prevailing attitudes toward the euphonium. The formation of the Tubists Universal Brotherhood Association (renamed the International Tuba Euphonium Association in 2000) as a supportive professional organization, the emergence of the tuba/euphonium ensemble as chamber music, new solo works by major composers, and the use of euphonium in nontraditional ensembles have all served to promote the instrument. The future of the euphonium will depend on exploring the possibilities of using the instrument in non-traditional ensembles, and on changing the way euphonium is taught in a way that will adjust to the changing musical climate.

Creator(s): Cottrell, Jeffrey S.
Creation Date: May 2004
Partner(s):
UNT Libraries
Collection(s):
UNT Theses and Dissertations
Usage:
Total Uses: 1,136
Past 30 days: 67
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Creator (Author):
Publisher Info:
Publisher Name: University of North Texas
Place of Publication: Denton, Texas
Date(s):
  • Creation: May 2004
  • Digitized: November 8, 2007
Description:

The euphonium has been a respected member of military bands, brass bands, and civilian concert (wind) bands since its invention in 1843. These bands were very visible to the public, and often performed popular music of the day. Since then, the euphonium has had occasional use in orchestral works, jazz, and in brass chamber groups as well. However, by the middle of the 20th century, its traditional use as an instrument of the wind band resulted in a prevailing attitude of the music world toward the euphonium as an instrument strictly for that purpose. This attitude, along with changing popular tastes in music, has over time caused professional opportunities for euphoniumists to become very limited. This lack of public expose for the instrument has therefore resulted in people outside of wind band experience being unaware of the euphonium's existence. There have been, however, positive signs in the last thirty years that changes are taking place in prevailing attitudes toward the euphonium. The formation of the Tubists Universal Brotherhood Association (renamed the International Tuba Euphonium Association in 2000) as a supportive professional organization, the emergence of the tuba/euphonium ensemble as chamber music, new solo works by major composers, and the use of euphonium in nontraditional ensembles have all served to promote the instrument. The future of the euphonium will depend on exploring the possibilities of using the instrument in non-traditional ensembles, and on changing the way euphonium is taught in a way that will adjust to the changing musical climate.

Degree:
Level: Doctoral
Discipline: Performance
Department: College of Music
Language(s):
Subject(s):
Keyword(s): euphonium | future | ensembles
Contributor(s):
Partner:
UNT Libraries
Collection:
UNT Theses and Dissertations
Identifier:
  • OCLC: 57203489 |
  • ARK: ark:/67531/metadc4529
Resource Type: Thesis or Dissertation
Format: Text
Rights:
Access: Public
License: Copyright
Holder: Cottrell, Jeffrey S.
Statement: Copyright is held by the author, unless otherwise noted. All rights reserved.