Instigating a Necessary Epiphany in Visual Message-Making for Design Educators and Future Communication Designers

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Description:

Man has used graphic signs and symbols to express a variety of thoughts and feelings since before the invention of writing; they have helped him to preserve the ideologies that have enabled him to articulate his conception of the world. Every culture in every historical era has invested the objects, animals and plants around it with a multitude of different psychological meanings to communicate its essential belief systems and social aspirations. In my document, I chose to shed light on the responsibility I believe design educators must assume regarding their ability to understand and teach the importance of how similar graphic signs, symbols, ideograms and icons are perceived differently by different cultures in the hyper-connected, inter-global economy of 21st century. It is very crucial not to discount the influence and correlation of symbolic, fundamental building blocks of design with the basic psychological functions that inform our subconscious, and are also informed by our individual social and cultural upbringings. People from different cultures may cognate these shapes similarly, but they perceive and encode their meanings based on their particular social and cultural influences. One-size-fits-all communication design solutions rarely work, especially when they are distributed to culturally diverse audiences, because various ethnic audiences view the world and the visual messages that designers create for them through their own self-imposed cultural filters. These filters are informed by language, religion, politics and other shared experiences, and they go beyond what can be externally observed. As communication designers, we need to take the time to study and understand how these filters operate, so that we can accurately convey our clients' messages to the intended audiences so that they might be appropriately encoded and perceived.

Creator(s): Sarkaria, Gagandeep
Creation Date: May 2004
Partner(s):
UNT Libraries
Collection(s):
UNT Theses and Dissertations
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Total Uses: 51
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Publisher Info:
Publisher Name: University of North Texas
Place of Publication: Denton, Texas
Date(s):
  • Creation: May 2004
  • Digitized: January 9, 2008
Description:

Man has used graphic signs and symbols to express a variety of thoughts and feelings since before the invention of writing; they have helped him to preserve the ideologies that have enabled him to articulate his conception of the world. Every culture in every historical era has invested the objects, animals and plants around it with a multitude of different psychological meanings to communicate its essential belief systems and social aspirations. In my document, I chose to shed light on the responsibility I believe design educators must assume regarding their ability to understand and teach the importance of how similar graphic signs, symbols, ideograms and icons are perceived differently by different cultures in the hyper-connected, inter-global economy of 21st century. It is very crucial not to discount the influence and correlation of symbolic, fundamental building blocks of design with the basic psychological functions that inform our subconscious, and are also informed by our individual social and cultural upbringings. People from different cultures may cognate these shapes similarly, but they perceive and encode their meanings based on their particular social and cultural influences. One-size-fits-all communication design solutions rarely work, especially when they are distributed to culturally diverse audiences, because various ethnic audiences view the world and the visual messages that designers create for them through their own self-imposed cultural filters. These filters are informed by language, religion, politics and other shared experiences, and they go beyond what can be externally observed. As communication designers, we need to take the time to study and understand how these filters operate, so that we can accurately convey our clients' messages to the intended audiences so that they might be appropriately encoded and perceived.

Degree:
Level: Master's
Note:

Problem in Lieu of Thesis

Language(s):
Subject(s):
Keyword(s): design research | cultural semiotics | cultural filters | encoding visual communications | cultural differences | cultural perceptions
Contributor(s):
Partner:
UNT Libraries
Collection:
UNT Theses and Dissertations
Identifier:
  • ARK: ark:/67531/metadc4451
Resource Type: Thesis or Dissertation
Format: Text
Rights:
Access: Use restricted to UNT Community
License: Copyright
Holder: Sarkaria, Gagandeep
Statement: Copyright is held by the author, unless otherwise noted. All rights reserved.