Storm Water System Monitoring for the Small Municipality Under Phase II of the National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System

Description:

Storm water quality can have a significant impact on receiving water bodies. The chief recipients of these impacts are aquatic life in the receiving water body and downstream water users. Over the last few decades, legislation, regulations, institutions and facilities have evolved to recognize the impact of urban storm water on receiving streams. This increased emphasis has caused contaminants in storm water to be identified as a major concern. This developing concern has generated an increased interest in the water quality of our streams and lakes and emphasized the need for more monitoring efforts. With the passage of the National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) Phase II requirements, small municipalities are responsible for storm water impacts on receiving waters within their jurisdiction. For the purposes of NPDES Phase II requirements, small municipalities are identified as these municipalities that are typically composed of 10,000 but less than 100,000 in population.
The purpose of this dissertation is to develop a manual for use by the staff of small municipalities in meeting the requirements prescribed by changes initiated in the NPDES Phase II regulations. Attempts were made to comply with these requirements within a very limited manpower and budget framework and to develop procedures that would allow for permit compliance using testing equipment that was both reliable and robust.
The users' manual provides valuable guidance in the establishment of a knowledge base for characterization of the watersheds selected for study. Chapter 3 of the dissertation contains a users' manual, designed for use by municipal staff members in their efforts to comply with the NPDES Phase II requirements.
Using the techniques and equipment capabilities developed during the writing of the users' manual a characterization of three watersheds within Denton County, Texas was developed. Non-storm water samples were taken from each of the streams and a baseline analysis was established. The three watersheds represented agricultural, suburban and urban settings. Storm water samples were obtained from multiple storms within all three watersheds and data analysis used to determine the character and impact of urban runoff.
Determination of the constituents for analysis was based on monitoring requirements of the NPDES Phase I and II requirements for owners and operators of municipal separate storm sewer systems (MS4) and on the Texas Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (TPDES) Multi-Sector General Permit (MSGP). The three watersheds were determined to have multiple statistically significant differences for some parameters between their Base Flows and Storm Flows. The impact of urban runoff on the receiving waters of these three drainage systems was clearly demonstrated throughout the testing period.

Creator(s): Peacock, Steven
Creation Date: August 2003
Partner(s):
UNT Libraries
Collection(s):
UNT Theses and Dissertations
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Total Uses: 93
Past 30 days: 1
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Creator (Author):
Publisher Info:
Publisher Name: University of North Texas
Place of Publication: Denton, Texas
Date(s):
  • Creation: August 2003
  • Digitized: March 8, 2004
Description:

Storm water quality can have a significant impact on receiving water bodies. The chief recipients of these impacts are aquatic life in the receiving water body and downstream water users. Over the last few decades, legislation, regulations, institutions and facilities have evolved to recognize the impact of urban storm water on receiving streams. This increased emphasis has caused contaminants in storm water to be identified as a major concern. This developing concern has generated an increased interest in the water quality of our streams and lakes and emphasized the need for more monitoring efforts. With the passage of the National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) Phase II requirements, small municipalities are responsible for storm water impacts on receiving waters within their jurisdiction. For the purposes of NPDES Phase II requirements, small municipalities are identified as these municipalities that are typically composed of 10,000 but less than 100,000 in population.
The purpose of this dissertation is to develop a manual for use by the staff of small municipalities in meeting the requirements prescribed by changes initiated in the NPDES Phase II regulations. Attempts were made to comply with these requirements within a very limited manpower and budget framework and to develop procedures that would allow for permit compliance using testing equipment that was both reliable and robust.
The users' manual provides valuable guidance in the establishment of a knowledge base for characterization of the watersheds selected for study. Chapter 3 of the dissertation contains a users' manual, designed for use by municipal staff members in their efforts to comply with the NPDES Phase II requirements.
Using the techniques and equipment capabilities developed during the writing of the users' manual a characterization of three watersheds within Denton County, Texas was developed. Non-storm water samples were taken from each of the streams and a baseline analysis was established. The three watersheds represented agricultural, suburban and urban settings. Storm water samples were obtained from multiple storms within all three watersheds and data analysis used to determine the character and impact of urban runoff.
Determination of the constituents for analysis was based on monitoring requirements of the NPDES Phase I and II requirements for owners and operators of municipal separate storm sewer systems (MS4) and on the Texas Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (TPDES) Multi-Sector General Permit (MSGP). The three watersheds were determined to have multiple statistically significant differences for some parameters between their Base Flows and Storm Flows. The impact of urban runoff on the receiving waters of these three drainage systems was clearly demonstrated throughout the testing period.

Degree:
Level: Doctoral
Language(s):
Subject(s):
Keyword(s): Storm water management | storm runoff | storm water monitoring
Contributor(s):
Partner:
UNT Libraries
Collection:
UNT Theses and Dissertations
Identifier:
  • OCLC: 53808605 |
  • UNTCAT: b2566967 |
  • ARK: ark:/67531/metadc4298
Resource Type: Thesis or Dissertation
Format: Text
Rights:
Access: Public
License: Copyright
Holder: Peacock, Steven
Statement: Copyright is held by the author, unless otherwise noted. All rights reserved.