Battle for the Punchbowl: The U. S. 1st Marine Division 1951 Fall Offensive of the Korean War

supply one-half unit of fire for all of its organic weapons. Soon after, a train of
carrgadores was dispatched with the requested allotment.72
Meanwhile, Fox Company's 2nd Platoon bogged down due to many casualties
and intense enemy fire. The NKPA bunkers were hard nuts to crack and continued to
deliver withering MG fire into the Marine ranks, filling the air with a swarm of snapping
bullets. Finally a bunker would fall to a Marine grenade, satchel charge, or MG and
small arms fire, and the advance would continue until another bunker slowed it down.
"At no time did our forward movement cease entirely; at least one unit was maneuvering
at all times, thus the enemy was not able to gain the time or opportunity to
counterattack."73
One bunker in particular stalled Fox's 2nd Platoon on the very crest of a finger
ridge of 812. Lt. Roth crawled and shuffled around his men to get a look and then
directed them to move on the south slope where there was some defilade and woods to
offer concealment. By this the platoon was able to outflank the bunker and avoid the
most deadly portion of its field of fire. Sgt Livingston (no first name supplied), the leader
of 1st Squad, led the final assault on this bunker. MG fire ripped across both his legs and
shrapnel tore into his hip and chest. Nevertheless, he refused immediate aid until other
even more-seriously wounded Marines were helped, and he drug himself forward. He
"continued to shout directions and encouragement to his advancing fire teams. His
inspiration and display of magnificent courage materially aided his squad to press the
72 "Historical Diary," Second Battalion, Fifth Marines, 43.
73 Ibid.

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Montandon, Joshua W. Battle for the Punchbowl: The U. S. 1st Marine Division 1951 Fall Offensive of the Korean War. Denton, Texas. UNT Digital Library. http://digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc3938/. Accessed November 22, 2014.