Prevalence of Eating Disorders and Disordered Eating Behaviors Among Male Collegiate Athletes

Description:

This article discusses the prevalence of eating disorders and disordered eating behaviors among male collegiate athletes.

Creator(s):
Creation Date: 2008  
Partner(s):
UNT College of Education
Collection(s):
UNT Scholarly Works
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Total Uses: 1,479
Past 30 days: 15
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Creator (Author):
Petrie, Trent A.

University of North Texas

Creator (Author):
Greenleaf, Christy

University of North Texas

Creator (Author):
Reel, Justine J.

University of Utah

Creator (Author):
Carter, Jennifer

Center for Healthy Living

Publisher Info:
Place of Publication: [Washington, D.C.]
Date(s):
  • Creation: 2008
Description:

This article discusses the prevalence of eating disorders and disordered eating behaviors among male collegiate athletes.

Degree:
Note:

Abstract: Male athletes have been hypothesized to be at increased risk for disordered eating attitudes and behaviors due to unique pressures in the sport environment. In this study, 203 male collegiate athletes from three universities completed the Questionnaire for Eating Disorder Diagnosis (QEDD; Mintz, O'Halloran, Mulholland, & Schneider, 1997) as well as provided information on binge eating and pathogenic weight control behaviors. None were classified with a clinical eating disorder, though almost 20% reported a sufficient number and level of symptoms to be considered symptomatic. Just over 80% had no significant eating disorder concerns and were classified as asymptomatic. Neither year in school, race/ethnicity, sport type, nor age were related to whether or not the athletes were symptomatic or asymptomatic. In terms of the athletes' body mass, fewer than 2% were underweight and 66% were classified as overweight or obese according to CDC guidelines; over 60% were satisfied with their current body weight. Although the frequency of pathogenic behaviors was low, exercise (37%) and fasting/dieting (14.2%) were the primary and secondary means for controlling weight; fewer than 10% used vomiting, laxatives, or diuretics.

Physical Description:

11 p.

Language(s):
Subject(s):
Keyword(s): eating disorders | pathogenic weight controls | male athletes
Source: Psychology of Men and Masculinity, 2008. Washington DC: American Psychological Association, pp. 267-277
Partner:
UNT College of Education
Collection:
UNT Scholarly Works
Identifier:
  • ARK: ark:/67531/metadc31092
Resource Type: Article
Format: Text
Rights:
Access: Public
Citation:
Publication Title: Psychology of Men and Masculinity
Volume: 9
Issue: 4
Page Start: 267
Page End: 277
Peer Reviewed: Yes