Fighting Fat: How Do Fat Stereotypes Influence Beliefs About Physical Education

Description:

Article discussing a study on how fat stereotypes influence beliefs about physical education.

Creator(s):
Creation Date: November 2008
Partner(s):
UNT College of Education
Collection(s):
UNT Scholarly Works
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Total Uses: 543
Past 30 days: 23
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Creator (Author):
Greenleaf, Christy

University of North Texas

Creator (Author):
Martin, Scott B.

University of North Texas

Creator (Author):
Rhea, Deborah J.

Texas Christian University

Publisher Info:
Publisher Name: Nature Publishing Group
Place of Publication: [London, United Kingdom]
Date(s):
  • Creation: November 2008
Description:

Article discussing a study on how fat stereotypes influence beliefs about physical education.

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Note:

Abstract: Objectives: The purpose of this study was to examine college students' beliefs about youth obesity, the roles of schools and physical education in addressing obesity, and the training they receive to work with overweight youth. Methods and Procedure: Physical education-related (n=212) and nonphysical education-related (n-218) majors completed a demographic questionnaire, a Modified Fat Stereotypes Questionnaire (M-FSQ), and a Perceptions of Physical Education Questionnaire. On the basis of M-FSQ scores, participants were identified as endorsing stereotypes (n=360) or not endorsing stereotypes (n=70). Results: The importance of youth being normal weight was rated most highly among participants in physical education-related majors and among those who endorsed fat stereotypes. Participants who endorsed fat stereotypes, compared to those who did not, were more likely to believe that all school professionals should be involved in treating childhood obesity. Participants who endorsed fat stereotypes, compared to those who did not, more strongly agreed that physical educators should be role models by maintaining a normal weight and educating parents on childhood obesity, and PE classes should focus on lifelong fitness. No group differences in perceived competencies to develop exercise, weight loss, nutritional, and educational programs for overweight youth were found. Discussion: Future research is needed to determine the extent to which these types of differences result from educational curricula that link weight and health and, possibly, reinforce negative stereotypes of overweight children. Methods for effectively intervening in educational training environments to reduce fat stereotypes among preprofessionals need to be investigated.

Physical Description:

7 p.

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Subject(s):
Keyword(s): physical education | overweight | stereotypes
Source: Obesity Journal, 2008. London: Nature Publishing Group, pp. S53-S59.
Partner:
UNT College of Education
Collection:
UNT Scholarly Works
Identifier:
  • ARK: ark:/67531/metadc31091
Resource Type: Article
Format: Text
Rights:
Access: Public
Citation:
Publication Title: Obesity Journal
Volume: 16
Issue: 2
Page Start: S53
Page End: S59
Pages: 7
Peer Reviewed: Yes