Self-Objectification Among Physically Active Women

Description:

This article discusses self-objectification among physically active women.

Creator(s): Greenleaf, Christy
Creation Date: January 2005
Partner(s):
UNT College of Education
Collection(s):
UNT Scholarly Works
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Past 30 days: 15
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Creator (Author):
Greenleaf, Christy

University of North Texas

Publisher Info:
Publisher Name: Springer
Place of Publication: [New York, New York]
Date(s):
  • Creation: January 2005
Description:

This article discusses self-objectification among physically active women.

Degree:
Note:

Abstract: Objectification Theory (Fredrickson & Roberts, 1997) was used to examine (a) the mediation effects of body shame and flow on the relationship between self-objectification and disordered eating, (b) age differences in self-objectification, body shame, flow, and disordered eating, (c) the prediction of physical activity from self-objectification, flow, body shame, and disordered eating, and (d) the relationships between self-objectification, flow, and physical activity. Participants were 394 women ages 18-64. Results revealed that (a) body shame medicated the relationship between self-objectification and disordered eating, (b) younger women reported higher levels of self-objectification, body shame, dieting, and several flow characteristics, (c) older women scored higher on the loss of self-consciousness subscale of the flow measure, and (d) self-objectification was a significant predictor of physical activity.

Physical Description:

12 p.

Language(s):
Subject(s):
Keyword(s): self-objectifications | body images | disordered eating
Source: Sex Roles, 2005. New York: Springer, pp. 51-62
Partner:
UNT College of Education
Collection:
UNT Scholarly Works
Identifier:
  • DOI: 10.1007/s11199-005-1193-8 |
  • ARK: ark:/67531/metadc31088
Resource Type: Article
Format: Text
Rights:
Access: Public
Citation:
Publication Title: Sex Roles
Volume: 52
Issue: 1/2
Page Start: 51
Page End: 62
Peer Reviewed: Yes