Awards of Attorneys' Fees by Federal Courts and Federal Agencies

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In the United States, the general rule, which derives from common law, is that each side in a legal proceeding pays for its own attorney. There are many exceptions, however, in which federal courts, and occasionally federal agencies, may order the losing party to pay the attorneys' fees of the prevailing party. There are roughly two hundred statutory exceptions, which were generally enacted to encourage private litigation to implement public policy.

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Creation Date: June 20, 2008
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UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Congressional Research Service Reports
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Place of Publication: Washington, D.C.
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  • Creation: June 20, 2008
Description:

In the United States, the general rule, which derives from common law, is that each side in a legal proceeding pays for its own attorney. There are many exceptions, however, in which federal courts, and occasionally federal agencies, may order the losing party to pay the attorneys' fees of the prevailing party. There are roughly two hundred statutory exceptions, which were generally enacted to encourage private litigation to implement public policy.

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UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Congressional Research Service Reports
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Resource Type: Report
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