The relationship of self-monitoring to team leader flexibility and work environment preference

Access: Use of this item is restricted to the UNT Community
Description:

This research explores the relationship of self-monitoring with team leader behavior and work environment preference. Those who are high on self-monitoring demonstrate flexibility in their actions with others and are socially perceptive. They perform well in a variety of leadership positions and are viewed as leaders by group members. High self-monitoring types choose "socially" based careers, including teacher and psychologist, in which they adapt their interaction styles to effectively meet the demands of clients. The demands placed on a team leader appear to require similar characteristics to those that high self-monitoring individuals possess. As a team matures through different stages of development, the role of the leader ranges from director to facilitator to consultant. In order to effectively meet team needs, a leader must be socially sensitive to interpersonal cues and have the ability to assume various roles. In addition, given the fact that the position of team leader is a highly social type of career that requires behaviors similar to careers chosen by high self-monitoring individuals, it is likely that high self-monitors would prefer working in a team work environment over a traditional one. A survey methodology was used to assess the characteristics of 100 team members. No relationship was found between self-monitoring and flexible team leader behavior. However, when a job relevant version of a traditional self-monitoring scale was used, some of the data suggested that flexible people prefer a team work environment over a traditional one. Also, individuals who demonstrated ineffective team leader behaviors tended to show a preference towards traditional work environments.

Creator(s): Nichols, Judith Ann
Creation Date: August 2000
Partner(s):
UNT Libraries
Collection(s):
UNT Theses and Dissertations
Usage:
Total Uses: 523
Past 30 days: 8
Yesterday: 0
Creator (Author):
Publisher Info:
Publisher Name: University of North Texas
Place of Publication: Denton, Texas
Date(s):
  • Creation: August 2000
  • Digitized: July 6, 2007
Description:

This research explores the relationship of self-monitoring with team leader behavior and work environment preference. Those who are high on self-monitoring demonstrate flexibility in their actions with others and are socially perceptive. They perform well in a variety of leadership positions and are viewed as leaders by group members. High self-monitoring types choose "socially" based careers, including teacher and psychologist, in which they adapt their interaction styles to effectively meet the demands of clients. The demands placed on a team leader appear to require similar characteristics to those that high self-monitoring individuals possess. As a team matures through different stages of development, the role of the leader ranges from director to facilitator to consultant. In order to effectively meet team needs, a leader must be socially sensitive to interpersonal cues and have the ability to assume various roles. In addition, given the fact that the position of team leader is a highly social type of career that requires behaviors similar to careers chosen by high self-monitoring individuals, it is likely that high self-monitors would prefer working in a team work environment over a traditional one. A survey methodology was used to assess the characteristics of 100 team members. No relationship was found between self-monitoring and flexible team leader behavior. However, when a job relevant version of a traditional self-monitoring scale was used, some of the data suggested that flexible people prefer a team work environment over a traditional one. Also, individuals who demonstrated ineffective team leader behaviors tended to show a preference towards traditional work environments.

Degree:
Level: Doctoral
Language(s):
Subject(s):
Keyword(s): work teams | self monitoring | leadership
Contributor(s):
Partner:
UNT Libraries
Collection:
UNT Theses and Dissertations
Identifier:
  • OCLC: 49962812 |
  • UNTCAT: b2375603 |
  • ARK: ark:/67531/metadc2556
Resource Type: Thesis or Dissertation
Format: Text
Rights:
Access: Use restricted to UNT Community
License: Copyright
Holder: Nichols, Judith Ann
Statement: Copyright is held by the author, unless otherwise noted. All rights reserved.