Effectiveness of a Child-Centered Self-Reflective Play Therapy Supervision Model

Description:

This study investigated the effectiveness of a child-centered self-reflective play therapy supervision model with master's level counselor education graduate students. Specifically, this research determined if the self-reflective play therapy supervision model facilitated significant change in the master's level play therapists': (a) child-centered attitude; (b) knowledge of child-centered play therapy; and (c) confidence in applying play therapy skills. This study also measured change in the skills of: (d) tracking behavior, (e) reflecting content, (f) reflecting feelings, (g) facilitating decision-making and self-responsibility, (h) facilitating esteem-building and encouragement, (i) encouraging the child to lead, (j) setting limits, (k) ability to be congruent, (l) quality of non-verbal responses and (m) quality of verbal responses.

The experimental group students (N=15) utilized a 15 week self-reflective play therapy supervision model. This model consisted of a manual that reviewed the rationale and utilization of six therapeutic responses of child-centered play therapy, self-assessment forms that were completed after reviewing weekly play therapy session videos and weekly group supervision. The control group (N=15) received supervision during the 15 weeks but did not use the manual or the self-assessment forms. Prior to working with their first client and again at the end of the semester practicum, the play therapy supervisees completed the Play Therapy Attitude-Knowledge-Skills Survey. Each supervisee submitted a pre-tape and a post-tape of a play therapy session during their semester practicum. Four doctoral students rated play therapy session video tapes using the Play Therapy Skills Assessment form. The play therapy session video tapes were assessed by objective raters.

An independent t-test utilizing the gain score as the dependent variable revealed that play therapy supervisees in the experimental group showed a statistically significant increase in their ability to implement the skill of tracking behavior, facilitating decision-making and self-responsibility and facilitating esteem-building and encouragement. In addition, the experimental group supervisees showed a significant increase in the quality of their verbal responses and a marginally significant increase in their ability to reflect content and reflect feelings. Limited statistical significance in the play therapy supervisee's improvement of skills possibly could be attributed to the small sample size and lack of random assignment of participants to the experimental and control group.

The positive trends in the play therapy supervisees increased ability to implement play therapy skills warrants additional research of the self-reflective supervision model.

Creator(s): Giordano, Maria A.
Creation Date: May 2000
Partner(s):
UNT Libraries
Collection(s):
UNT Theses and Dissertations
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Publisher Info:
Publisher Name: University of North Texas
Place of Publication: Denton, Texas
Date(s):
  • Creation: May 2000
  • Digitized: June 26, 2007
Description:

This study investigated the effectiveness of a child-centered self-reflective play therapy supervision model with master's level counselor education graduate students. Specifically, this research determined if the self-reflective play therapy supervision model facilitated significant change in the master's level play therapists': (a) child-centered attitude; (b) knowledge of child-centered play therapy; and (c) confidence in applying play therapy skills. This study also measured change in the skills of: (d) tracking behavior, (e) reflecting content, (f) reflecting feelings, (g) facilitating decision-making and self-responsibility, (h) facilitating esteem-building and encouragement, (i) encouraging the child to lead, (j) setting limits, (k) ability to be congruent, (l) quality of non-verbal responses and (m) quality of verbal responses.

The experimental group students (N=15) utilized a 15 week self-reflective play therapy supervision model. This model consisted of a manual that reviewed the rationale and utilization of six therapeutic responses of child-centered play therapy, self-assessment forms that were completed after reviewing weekly play therapy session videos and weekly group supervision. The control group (N=15) received supervision during the 15 weeks but did not use the manual or the self-assessment forms. Prior to working with their first client and again at the end of the semester practicum, the play therapy supervisees completed the Play Therapy Attitude-Knowledge-Skills Survey. Each supervisee submitted a pre-tape and a post-tape of a play therapy session during their semester practicum. Four doctoral students rated play therapy session video tapes using the Play Therapy Skills Assessment form. The play therapy session video tapes were assessed by objective raters.

An independent t-test utilizing the gain score as the dependent variable revealed that play therapy supervisees in the experimental group showed a statistically significant increase in their ability to implement the skill of tracking behavior, facilitating decision-making and self-responsibility and facilitating esteem-building and encouragement. In addition, the experimental group supervisees showed a significant increase in the quality of their verbal responses and a marginally significant increase in their ability to reflect content and reflect feelings. Limited statistical significance in the play therapy supervisee's improvement of skills possibly could be attributed to the small sample size and lack of random assignment of participants to the experimental and control group.

The positive trends in the play therapy supervisees increased ability to implement play therapy skills warrants additional research of the self-reflective supervision model.

Degree:
Level: Doctoral
Language(s):
Subject(s):
Keyword(s): Play therapy | Teacher education
Contributor(s):
Partner:
UNT Libraries
Collection:
UNT Theses and Dissertations
Identifier:
  • OCLC: 47151702 |
  • UNTCAT: b2300322 |
  • ARK: ark:/67531/metadc2531
Resource Type: Thesis or Dissertation
Format: Text
Rights:
Access: Public
License: Copyright
Holder: Giordano, Maria A.
Statement: Copyright is held by the author, unless otherwise noted. All rights reserved.