Comparative mitochondrial DNA sequence diversity in isolated and open populations of Southern flying squirrels (Glaucomys volans)

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Description:

Three populations of Southern flying squirrels were studied in the Ouachita Mountains of Arkansas to assess the impact of population subdivision-due to island formation--on the population genetics of Glaucomys volans. One island, one mainland, and one open population were investigated. A 367 nucleotide hypervariable region of mitochondrial DNA was sequenced in individuals from each population. Individuals and populations were compared to assess relatedness. Higher sequence diversity was detected in the open and island populations. One island individual shared characters with both the island and mainland populations. Results support the hypothesis that the mainland population may have reduced gene flow. Also, the island population may have been originally founded by at least two maternal lineages.

Creator(s): Cook, Melaney Birdsong
Creation Date: August 1999
Partner(s):
UNT Libraries
Collection(s):
UNT Theses and Dissertations
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Total Uses: 90
Past 30 days: 2
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Publisher Info:
Publisher Name: University of North Texas
Place of Publication: Denton, Texas
Date(s):
  • Creation: August 1999
  • Digitized: June 14, 2007
Description:

Three populations of Southern flying squirrels were studied in the Ouachita Mountains of Arkansas to assess the impact of population subdivision-due to island formation--on the population genetics of Glaucomys volans. One island, one mainland, and one open population were investigated. A 367 nucleotide hypervariable region of mitochondrial DNA was sequenced in individuals from each population. Individuals and populations were compared to assess relatedness. Higher sequence diversity was detected in the open and island populations. One island individual shared characters with both the island and mainland populations. Results support the hypothesis that the mainland population may have reduced gene flow. Also, the island population may have been originally founded by at least two maternal lineages.

Degree:
Level: Master's
Discipline: Molecular Biology
Language(s):
Subject(s):
Keyword(s): Ouachita Mountains | island formation | population genetics
Contributor(s):
Partner:
UNT Libraries
Collection:
UNT Theses and Dissertations
Identifier:
  • OCLC: 45110690 |
  • UNTCAT: b2230551 |
  • ARK: ark:/67531/metadc2222
Resource Type: Thesis or Dissertation
Format: Text
Rights:
Access: Use restricted to UNT Community
License: Copyright
Holder: Cook, Melaney Birdsong
Statement: Copyright is held by the author, unless otherwise noted. All rights reserved.