Integrating Ecology and Environmental Ethics: Earth Stewardship in the Southern End of the Americas

Description:

This article discusses integrating ecology and environmental ethics.

Creator(s):
Creation Date: March 2012
Partner(s):
UNT College of Arts and Sciences
Collection(s):
UNT Scholarly Works
Usage:
Total Uses: 79
Past 30 days: 0
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Creator (Author):
Rozzi, Ricardo, 1960-

University of North Texas

Creator (Author):
Armesto, Juan J., 1953-

Institute of Ecology and Biodiversity

Creator (Author):
Gutiérrez, Julio R., 1953-

Institute of Ecology and Biodiversity

Creator (Author):
Massardo, Francisca

University of Magallanes

Creator (Author):
Likens, Gene E., 1935-

Cary Institute of Ecosystem Studies

Creator (Author):
Anderson, Christopher B.

University of North Texas

Creator (Author):
Poole, Alexandria

University of North Texas

Creator (Author):
Moses, Kelli

University of North Texas

Creator (Author):
Hargrove, Eugene C., 1944-

University of North Texas

Creator (Author):
Mansilla, Andrés O.

University of Magallanes

Creator (Author):
Kennedy, James H.

University of North Texas

Creator (Author):
Willson, Mary F.

Senda Darwin Biological Station

Creator (Author):
Jax, Kurt, 1958-

Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research

Creator (Author):
Jones, Clive G.

Cary Institute of Ecosystem Studies

Creator (Author):
Callicott, J. Baird

University of North Texas

Creator (Author):
Kalin Arroyo, Mary T.

Institute of Ecology and Biodiversity

Publisher Info:
Place of Publication: [Reston, Virginia]
Date(s):
  • Creation: March 2012
Description:

This article discusses integrating ecology and environmental ethics.

Degree:
Department: Biological Sciences
Note:

Abstract: The South American temperate and sub-Antarctic forests cover the longest latitudinal range in the Southern Hemisphere and include the world's southernmost forests. However, until now, this unique biome has been absent from global ecosystem research and monitoring networks. Moreover, the latitudinal range of between 40 degrees (°) south (S) and 60°S constitutes a conspicuous gap in the International Long-Term Ecological Research (ILTER) and other international networks. The authors first identify 10 globally salient attributes of biological and cultural diversity in southwestern South America. The authors then present the nascent Chilean Long-Term Socio-Ecological Research (LTSER) network, which will incorporate a new biome into ILTER. Finally, the authors introduce the field environmental philosophy methodology, developed by the Chilean LTSER network to integrate ecological sciences and environmental ethics into graduate education and biocultural conservation. This approach broadens the prevailing economic spectrum of social dimensions considered by LTSER programs and helps foster bioculturally diverse forms of Earth stewardship.

Physical Description:

11 p.

Language(s):
Subject(s):
Keyword(s): conservation | temperate forests | sub-Antarctic ecoregion | long-term ecological research | field stations
Source: BioScience, 2012, Reston: American Institute of Biological Sciences, pp. 226-236
Partner:
UNT College of Arts and Sciences
Collection:
UNT Scholarly Works
Identifier:
  • DOI: 10.1525/bio.2012.62.3.4 |
  • ARK: ark:/67531/metadc130199
Resource Type: Article
Format: Text
Rights:
Access: Public
Citation:
Publication Title: BioScience
Volume: 62
Issue: 3
Page Start: 226
Page End: 236
Peer Reviewed: Yes