Derivation of the evolution of empathic other-regarding social emotions as compared to non-social self-regarding emotions

Description:

Article accompanying a poster presentation for the 2012 Computational Neuroscience Annual Meeting. This article discusses the derivation of the evolution of empathic other-regarding social emotions as compared to non-social self-regarding emotions.

Creator(s): Tam, Nicoladie D.
Creation Date: July 16, 2012
Partner(s):
UNT College of Arts and Sciences
Collection(s):
UNT Scholarly Works
Usage:
Total Uses: 20
Past 30 days: 4
Yesterday: 0
Creator (Author):
Tam, Nicoladie D.

University of North Texas

Publisher Info:
Publisher Name: BioMed Central Ltd.
Place of Publication: [London, United Kingdom]
Date(s):
  • Creation: July 16, 2012
Description:

Article accompanying a poster presentation for the 2012 Computational Neuroscience Annual Meeting. This article discusses the derivation of the evolution of empathic other-regarding social emotions as compared to non-social self-regarding emotions.

Degree:
Department: Biological Sciences
Note:

Abstract: The present study derives the evolution of social emotions by inclusion of other-regarding concerns from the non-social emotions of self-regarding concerns. Emotional processing is a self-discovered error-correction feedback process in which computations are involved to assess the accuracy of the internal brain-generated predictions with respect to the reality, in order to increase its probability of an organism's own survival.

Physical Description:

2 p.

Language(s):
Subject(s):
Keyword(s): social emotions | emotional processing | social entity
Source: Twenty-First Annual Computational Neuroscience Meeting: CNS, 2012, Decatur, Georgia, United States
Partner:
UNT College of Arts and Sciences
Collection:
UNT Scholarly Works
Identifier:
  • DOI: 10.1186/1471-2202-12-S1-P28
  • ARK: ark:/67531/metadc122156
Resource Type: Article
Format: Text
Rights:
Access: Public
Citation:
Publication Title: BMC Neuroscience
Volume: 13
Issue: Suppl 1
Peer Reviewed: Yes