Proceedings of the 1st International Workshop on Social Network Approaches to Urban and Regional Carbon Management 5-7 April, 2005, Tsukuba, Japan

Description:

This proceedings provides possible answer to the question of what social network analysis can contribute to addressing the problem of climate change. In the workshop, social scientists from Japan, the USA, and Europe reported on social network theory, applications and methodology to envision their use for on-the-ground social change regarding carbon management. The earth has always cycled carbon in the atmosphere (mainly as CO2); in the oceans (surface, intermediate waters, deep waters and marine sediments); in terrestrial ecosystems (vegetation, litter and soil); in rivers and estuaries; and in fossil carbon, which is being remobilized by human activities. However, with the rate of fossil fuel burning feeding industrialization, urbanization and transportation and with large scale land clearing, the naturally balanced carbon cycle is in a non-analogous and dangerous state. The participants agreed that current management of the carbon cycle is piecemeal, careless, inconsistent, profligate and shortsighted. Enabled by past and current networks of power, the world has embraced a carbon culture that has spun out of control in the past 100 years. This issue has often been referred to as a problem of scale in the climate change research community (or frames in the social science community). Climate researchers have focused their analyses on global level simulations that are too abstract and removed from local level policy concerns. Successful carbon management in the future will have to bridge this gap by mapping different stakeholder needs and finding synergistic intersections for policy implementation.

Creator(s):
Creation Date: January 15, 2006
Partner(s):
UNT Libraries
Collection(s):
Environmental Policy Collection
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Publisher Info:
Publisher Name: Global Carbon Project and
Publisher Info: http://www.globalcarbonproject.org/
Publisher Info:
Publisher Info: http://www.nies.go.jp/
Place of Publication: Tsukuba, Japan
Date(s):
  • Creation: January 15, 2006
Description:

This proceedings provides possible answer to the question of what social network analysis can contribute to addressing the problem of climate change. In the workshop, social scientists from Japan, the USA, and Europe reported on social network theory, applications and methodology to envision their use for on-the-ground social change regarding carbon management. The earth has always cycled carbon in the atmosphere (mainly as CO2); in the oceans (surface, intermediate waters, deep waters and marine sediments); in terrestrial ecosystems (vegetation, litter and soil); in rivers and estuaries; and in fossil carbon, which is being remobilized by human activities. However, with the rate of fossil fuel burning feeding industrialization, urbanization and transportation and with large scale land clearing, the naturally balanced carbon cycle is in a non-analogous and dangerous state. The participants agreed that current management of the carbon cycle is piecemeal, careless, inconsistent, profligate and shortsighted. Enabled by past and current networks of power, the world has embraced a carbon culture that has spun out of control in the past 100 years. This issue has often been referred to as a problem of scale in the climate change research community (or frames in the social science community). Climate researchers have focused their analyses on global level simulations that are too abstract and removed from local level policy concerns. Successful carbon management in the future will have to bridge this gap by mapping different stakeholder needs and finding synergistic intersections for policy implementation.

Physical Description:

iv, 129 p. : col. ill.

Language(s):
Subject(s):
Keyword(s): social networks | carbon cycle | human contributions and responses | decision-support resources | sustainability | ecosystems | carbon budgets | environmental communication
Added Title: Global Carbon Project Report (GCP) No. 2
Series Title: GCP Report
Partner:
UNT Libraries
Collection:
Environmental Policy Collection
Identifier:
Resource Type: Text
Format: Text