An investigation of factors affecting Omani faculty members' adoption of information and computing technology.

Description:

The purpose of this study was to explore the factors influencing information and computing technology (ICT) adoption for Omani faculty members from a framework of Rogers' theory of diffusion of innovation. Three hundred Omani faculty members from Sultan Qaboos University (SQU) participated in the study. The survey consisted of five parts: (a) an 18-item questionnaire on ICT uses and skills, (b) a 1-item questionnaire on adopter category, (c) a 44-item self-constructed questionnaire on perception of barriers to adopting ICT, (d) a 50-item questionnaire on ICT attributes adapted from Moore and Benbasat, and (e) a 15-item questionnaire on demographic and job-related variables. Descriptive statistics indicated that the faculty members overall used ICT at the "Sometimes" level and had ICT skills at the "Intermediate" level. The most frequently used and skillful ICT functional areas were Website browsing, Internet search engine, and word processing. One-way ANOVAs found significant group differences of ICT uses and skills, perception of barriers, and perception of ICT attributes in the category of adopter. Early adopters used ICT more, had higher ICT skills, perceived fewer barriers in the adopting process, and recognized higher values of ICT attributes than later adopters did. Multiple regression analysis showed the level of ICT uses could be predicted by ICT skills, adopter category, perception of barriers, ICT attributes, and the selected demographic and job-rated background variables, to a large magnitude with an adjusted R2 value of .70. The level of ICT skills was the most salient predictor. Perception of ICT attributes and the number of traditional classes taught appeared to be important as well. Results supported Rogers' theory at the macro level but not at the micro level.

Creator(s): Al Senaidi, Said
Creation Date: August 2009
Partner(s):
UNT Libraries
Collection(s):
UNT Theses and Dissertations
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Publisher Info:
Publisher Name: University of North Texas
Place of Publication: Denton, Texas
Date(s):
  • Creation: August 2009
  • Digitized: October 30, 2009
Description:

The purpose of this study was to explore the factors influencing information and computing technology (ICT) adoption for Omani faculty members from a framework of Rogers' theory of diffusion of innovation. Three hundred Omani faculty members from Sultan Qaboos University (SQU) participated in the study. The survey consisted of five parts: (a) an 18-item questionnaire on ICT uses and skills, (b) a 1-item questionnaire on adopter category, (c) a 44-item self-constructed questionnaire on perception of barriers to adopting ICT, (d) a 50-item questionnaire on ICT attributes adapted from Moore and Benbasat, and (e) a 15-item questionnaire on demographic and job-related variables. Descriptive statistics indicated that the faculty members overall used ICT at the "Sometimes" level and had ICT skills at the "Intermediate" level. The most frequently used and skillful ICT functional areas were Website browsing, Internet search engine, and word processing. One-way ANOVAs found significant group differences of ICT uses and skills, perception of barriers, and perception of ICT attributes in the category of adopter. Early adopters used ICT more, had higher ICT skills, perceived fewer barriers in the adopting process, and recognized higher values of ICT attributes than later adopters did. Multiple regression analysis showed the level of ICT uses could be predicted by ICT skills, adopter category, perception of barriers, ICT attributes, and the selected demographic and job-rated background variables, to a large magnitude with an adjusted R2 value of .70. The level of ICT skills was the most salient predictor. Perception of ICT attributes and the number of traditional classes taught appeared to be important as well. Results supported Rogers' theory at the macro level but not at the micro level.

Degree:
Level: Doctoral
Language(s):
Subject(s):
Keyword(s): Information technology | IT adoption | Sultanate of Oman | Sultan Qaboos University | computer education
Contributor(s):
Partner:
UNT Libraries
Collection:
UNT Theses and Dissertations
Identifier:
  • OCLC: 488647972 |
  • UNTCAT: b3807063 |
  • ARK: ark:/67531/metadc11063
Resource Type: Thesis or Dissertation
Format: Text
Rights:
Access: Public
License: Copyright
Holder: Al Senaidi, Said
Statement: Copyright is held by the author, unless otherwise noted. All rights reserved.