Linkage of a nitrilase-containing Nit1C gene cluster to cyanide utilization in Pseudomonas fluorescens NCIMB 11764.

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Pseudomonas fluorescens NCIMB 11764 (Pf11764) is uniquely able to grow on the poison cyanide as its sole nitrogen source. It does so by converting cyanide oxidatively to carbon dioxide and ammonia, the latter being assimilated into cellular molecules. This requires a complex enzymatic machinery that includes nitrilase and oxygenase enzymes the nature of which are not well understood. In the course of a proteomics analysis aimed at achieving a better understanding of the proteins that may be required for cyanide degradation by Pf11764, an unknown protein of 17.8 kDa was detected in cells exposed to cyanide. Analysis of this protein by ESI-coupled mass spectrometry and bioinformatics searches gave evidence of strong homology with a protein (Hyp1) of unknown function (hypothetical) present in the bacterium Photorhabdus luminescens subsp. laumondii TTO1 (locus plu_1232). A search of available microbial genomes revealed a number of Hyp1 orthologs the genes of which are found in a conserved gene cluster known as Nit1C. Independent studies revealed that in addition to Hyp1, Pf11764 possesses a gene (nit) specifying a nitrilase enzyme whose closest homologue is a nitrilase found in Nit1C gene clusters (77% amino acid identity). DNA sequence analysis has further revealed that indeed, hyp1Pf11764 and nitPf11764 are contained in a cluster that includes also a gene specifying an oxygenase. Given the possible connection of Nit1C-endoded nitrilase and oxygenase enzymes to enzymatic cyanide degradation, there is strong reason for thinking that the genes specifying these enzymes contribute to bacterial growth on cyanide in those bacteria containing the Nit1C cluster. Because the biological function of the Hyp1 protein is currently unknown, it was cloned and the protein expressed in E. coli so that its properties could further be explored. Unfortunately, the expression of the protein in an insoluble form complicated these analyses. However, at least two lines of evidence suggest a possible role as a regulator of gene expression. First, over-expression of the protein was accompanied by the parallel elevation of the putative vector-encoded b-lactamase, implying that Hyp1Pf11764 can affect the expression of other genes. Second, a comparison of the amino acid sequence of select peptide fragments of Hyp1Pf11764, by conducting searches for homology with proteins in the existing nonredundant protein database, consistently revealed motifs in common with those present in bacterial response regulators that are part of two-component signal transduction systems widely distributed in bacteria.

Creator(s): Ghosh, Pallab
Creation Date: May 2009
Partner(s):
UNT Libraries
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UNT Theses and Dissertations
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Publisher Info:
Publisher Name: University of North Texas
Place of Publication: Denton, Texas
Date(s):
  • Creation: May 2009
  • Digitized: October 30, 2009
Description:

Pseudomonas fluorescens NCIMB 11764 (Pf11764) is uniquely able to grow on the poison cyanide as its sole nitrogen source. It does so by converting cyanide oxidatively to carbon dioxide and ammonia, the latter being assimilated into cellular molecules. This requires a complex enzymatic machinery that includes nitrilase and oxygenase enzymes the nature of which are not well understood. In the course of a proteomics analysis aimed at achieving a better understanding of the proteins that may be required for cyanide degradation by Pf11764, an unknown protein of 17.8 kDa was detected in cells exposed to cyanide. Analysis of this protein by ESI-coupled mass spectrometry and bioinformatics searches gave evidence of strong homology with a protein (Hyp1) of unknown function (hypothetical) present in the bacterium Photorhabdus luminescens subsp. laumondii TTO1 (locus plu_1232). A search of available microbial genomes revealed a number of Hyp1 orthologs the genes of which are found in a conserved gene cluster known as Nit1C. Independent studies revealed that in addition to Hyp1, Pf11764 possesses a gene (nit) specifying a nitrilase enzyme whose closest homologue is a nitrilase found in Nit1C gene clusters (77% amino acid identity). DNA sequence analysis has further revealed that indeed, hyp1Pf11764 and nitPf11764 are contained in a cluster that includes also a gene specifying an oxygenase. Given the possible connection of Nit1C-endoded nitrilase and oxygenase enzymes to enzymatic cyanide degradation, there is strong reason for thinking that the genes specifying these enzymes contribute to bacterial growth on cyanide in those bacteria containing the Nit1C cluster. Because the biological function of the Hyp1 protein is currently unknown, it was cloned and the protein expressed in E. coli so that its properties could further be explored. Unfortunately, the expression of the protein in an insoluble form complicated these analyses. However, at least two lines of evidence suggest a possible role as a regulator of gene expression. First, over-expression of the protein was accompanied by the parallel elevation of the putative vector-encoded b-lactamase, implying that Hyp1Pf11764 can affect the expression of other genes. Second, a comparison of the amino acid sequence of select peptide fragments of Hyp1Pf11764, by conducting searches for homology with proteins in the existing nonredundant protein database, consistently revealed motifs in common with those present in bacterial response regulators that are part of two-component signal transduction systems widely distributed in bacteria.

Degree:
Level: Master's
Discipline: Molecular Biology
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Keyword(s): Hyp1 | cyanide | nitic | nitrilase
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Partner:
UNT Libraries
Collection:
UNT Theses and Dissertations
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  • OCLC: 474851774 |
  • UNTCAT: b3805519 |
  • ARK: ark:/67531/metadc10993
Resource Type: Thesis or Dissertation
Format: Text
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Access: Use restricted to UNT Community
License: Copyright
Holder: Ghosh, Pallab
Statement: Copyright is held by the author, unless otherwise noted. All rights reserved.