Agricultural Biotechnology: The U.S.-EU Dispute

Description:

In May 2003, the United States, Canada, and Argentina initiated a formal challenge before the World Trade Organization (WTO) of the European Union’s (EU’s) de facto moratorium on approving new agricultural biotechnology products, in place since 1998. Although the EU effectively lifted the moratorium in May 2004 by approving a genetically engineered (GE) corn variety, the three countries are pursuing the case, in part because a number of EU member states continue to block approved biotech products. Because of delays, the WTO is expected to decide the case by December 2005. The moratorium reportedly cost U.S. corn growers some $300 million in exports to the EU annually. The EU moratorium, U.S. officials contend, threatened other agricultural exports not only to the EU, but also to other parts of the world where the EU approach to regulating agricultural biotechnology is taking hold.

Creator(s):
Location(s):
Creation Date: March 10, 2006
Partner(s):
UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Collection(s):
Congressional Research Service Reports
Usage:
Total Uses: 120
Past 30 days: 3
Yesterday: 1
Creator (Author):
Creator (Author):
Publisher Info:
Place of Publication: Washington D.C., USA
Date(s):
  • Creation: March 10, 2006
Coverage:
Place
Belgium
Place
Germany
Place
France
Place
Italy
Place
Luxembourg
Place
Netherlands
Place
Denmark
Place
Ireland
Place
United Kingdom
Place
Greece
Place
Spain
Place
Portugal
Place
Austria
Place
Finland
Place
Sweden
Place
Czech Republic
Place
Estonia
Place
Cyprus
Place
Latvia
Place
Lithuania
Place
Hungary
Place
Malta
Place
Poland
Place
Slovakia
Place
Slovenia
Description:

In May 2003, the United States, Canada, and Argentina initiated a formal challenge before the World Trade Organization (WTO) of the European Union’s (EU’s) de facto moratorium on approving new agricultural biotechnology products, in place since 1998. Although the EU effectively lifted the moratorium in May 2004 by approving a genetically engineered (GE) corn variety, the three countries are pursuing the case, in part because a number of EU member states continue to block approved biotech products. Because of delays, the WTO is expected to decide the case by December 2005. The moratorium reportedly cost U.S. corn growers some $300 million in exports to the EU annually. The EU moratorium, U.S. officials contend, threatened other agricultural exports not only to the EU, but also to other parts of the world where the EU approach to regulating agricultural biotechnology is taking hold.

Physical Description:

6 pages.

Language(s):
Subject(s):
Keyword(s): European Union
Partner:
UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Collection:
Congressional Research Service Reports
Identifier:
Resource Type: Report
Format: Text
Rights:
Access: Public