Energy Tax Policy

Description:

The Clinton Administration’s FY2001 budget proposes several tax subsidies for energy conservation and alternative fuels: 1) solar energy tax credits very similar to those that expired in 1985; 2) a new tax credit for the cost of a new home that would meet certain energy efficiency standards; 3) a tax credit for advanced energy-efficient equipment for space heating and cooling and hot water heaters; 4) more accelerated depreciation deductions for distributed power technologies, including small electrical generating systems (self-generated power), and for co-generation systems; 5) a new tax credit for the purchase of hybrid vehicles – cars, minivans, sport utility vehicles, and pickups – that run alternately on a consumable fuel (such as gasoline) and a rechargeable energy storage system (such as an electric battery); 6) extension of the present $4,000 tax credit for electric vehicles, which would otherwise terminate on 2004; and 7) a liberalization of the renewable electricity credit from such wind systems and closed-loop biomass systems.

Creator(s):
Creation Date: November 9, 2000
Partner(s):
UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Collection(s):
Congressional Research Service Reports
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Place of Publication: Washington D.C., USA
Date(s):
  • Creation: November 9, 2000
Description:

The Clinton Administration’s FY2001 budget proposes several tax subsidies for energy conservation and alternative fuels: 1) solar energy tax credits very similar to those that expired in 1985; 2) a new tax credit for the cost of a new home that would meet certain energy efficiency standards; 3) a tax credit for advanced energy-efficient equipment for space heating and cooling and hot water heaters; 4) more accelerated depreciation deductions for distributed power technologies, including small electrical generating systems (self-generated power), and for co-generation systems; 5) a new tax credit for the purchase of hybrid vehicles – cars, minivans, sport utility vehicles, and pickups – that run alternately on a consumable fuel (such as gasoline) and a rechargeable energy storage system (such as an electric battery); 6) extension of the present $4,000 tax credit for electric vehicles, which would otherwise terminate on 2004; and 7) a liberalization of the renewable electricity credit from such wind systems and closed-loop biomass systems.

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19 pages.

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Partner:
UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Collection:
Congressional Research Service Reports
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Resource Type: Report
Format: Text